Showing posts with label WITTGENSTEIN Ludwig. Show all posts
Showing posts with label WITTGENSTEIN Ludwig. Show all posts

Oct 31, 2019

For Wittgenstein, Philosophy Had to Be as Complicated as the Knots it Unties
Making Sense of Nonsense, From Bertrand Russell to the Existentialists


In Britain, the arrival of existentialism was celebrated mainly in small literary magazines, beginning in 1947 with a radical Catholic quarterly called The Changing World. The editor, Bernard Wall, described it as a response to “a cloud hanging over everything we do in this ‘post-war period’”—not only the atom bomb, and the encroachments of technology, but also the fact that, during the war, British thinkers became “cut off from fellow Europeans.” The intellectual focus would have to be “continental,” he explained, because “to disregard Kierkegaard, Nietzsche and Bergson, was to disregard what really mattered in our age.” For the two years of its existence, Changing World promoted “continental” lines in everything from sociology to contemporary art and poetry (it also published new work by Auden); but its main topic was French existentialism, especially a “theist current” associated with Gabriel Marcel.
By the time Changing World ceased publication in 1949, existentialism had become a talking point throughout the English-speaking world, though it was often ridiculed rather than revered: The Spectator, for example, published a feature on “resistentialism,” whose doctrine that “things are against us” was all the rage in Paris. The satire was well-aimed: existentialism was being promoted in the periodical press less as an occasion for sustained self-examination than as a spectacle in which earnest foreigners said strange things with inexplicable passion; and when Wittgenstein saw the first issue of Changing World he dismissed it as “muck.”
*
He made one exception, however: an article by his friend Yorick Smythies on Bertrand Russell’s History of Western Philosophy, which had appeared in 1946. Russell still regarded himself as a fearless philosophical revolutionary, but in this work he adopted the same assumptions that had informed histories of philosophy for the past three centuries. Like his predecessors, he postulated what he called a “long development, from 600 BC to the present day”—a process in which philosophy had lurched from one metaphysical “system” to another until recent times, when it settled into enlightened equilibrium. He also followed convention in dividing the story into three periods: “ancient philosophy,” where the Greeks discovered logic and mathematics and got into a habit of denigrating empirical knowledge; the “middle ages,” when philosophy was deformed by Christianity; and finally “modern philosophy,” starting with the reassertion of human intellectual independence in the Renaissance.

Descartes had often been called “the founder of modern philosophy”—“rightly,” in Russell’s judgement—but his exaggerated rationalism generated a sequence of “insane forms of subjectivism” culminating in Kant and German idealism. In the meantime, however, the British empiricists had rediscovered “the world of everyday common sense,” and their patience was eventually rewarded by the total defeat of speculative metaphysics.
Philosophy was “not a theory,” but the practice of clarifying thoughts that are otherwise “opaque and blurred.”
Russell had not abandoned an old tradition of sententious wisdom, however: he rhapsodized about “the moment of contemplative insight when, rising above the animal life, we become conscious of the greater ends that redeem man from the life of the brutes,” and he claimed that “love and knowledge and delight in beauty . . . are enough to fill the lives of the greatest men that have ever lived.”
On the other hand he also tried–—like G. H. Lewes, whose still-popular Biographical History had appeared exactly a century before—to enliven his survey with sallies of belittling wit. Pythagoras, for instance, was “a combination of Einstein and Mrs. Eddy,” and founded a religion based on “the sinfulness of eating beans,” and Plato, who was “hardly ever intellectually honest,” simply perpetuated his errors. Russell sustained his pert sense of humor for 800 pages, with Hegel “departing from logic in order to be free to advocate crimes,” while Nietzsche was a “megalomaniac” who was afraid of women and “soothed his wounded vanity with unkind remarks.”
Russell was eccentric in some of his choices—he included a chapter on Byron, for example, and made no mention of Lessing, Kierkegaard or Wittgenstein. Like the other authors of histories that promised to tell a unified story of philosophy from its supposed “origin” to the present, however, he concluded with a chapter arguing that philosophy had recently overcome the problems that had beset it from the beginning. He disagreed, of course, with those who ended the story with eclecticism or Kant or German idealism, and did not go along with Lewes in making it culminate in Comte and Mill. Instead, he presented it as leading up to his own doctrine of “logical analysis,” which seems to have rescued philosophy from the “system builders,” endowing it with “the quality of science” and forcing it to “tackle its problems one at a time.” He commended his theory of descriptions for clearing up “two millennia of muddle-headedness about ‘existence,’” and claimed that his conception of mathematics as “merely verbal knowledge” had liberated philosophy from the “presumption against empiricism” that had hobbled it since Pythagoras and Plato.
*
History of Western Philosophy brought Russell great wealth and helped him win the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1950. When Isaiah Berlin reviewed it in Mind, he praised its “peculiar combination of moral conviction and inexhaustible intellectual fertility” and its “beautiful and luminous prose.” Professionals would value it as the intellectual self-portrait of the world’s most eminent philosopher, rather than a contribution to “historical or philosophical scholarship,” but it was not written for them: it was addressed to the “common reader,” who was indeed fortunate that a “great master,” had condescended to write a popular introduction to philosophy that was “not merely classically clear but scrupulously honest throughout.”
According to Smythies, however, the book embodied all the “worst features” of Russell’s journalism—“shoddiness of thought,” “sleek prose,” and “easy shortcuts to judgements on serious matters.” Russell had simplified his task by playing along with a common misconception about philosophy: that it deals in “theories” designed, as in the natural sciences, to reflect the facts of experience, and that it progresses towards truth by collecting facts and finding better ways of representing them. This assumption allowed Russell to adopt his “lofty manner,” looking down on the “great men” of the past and treating their ideas as “something left behind by ‘modern science.’” The impression he gave was that (thanks to him) all problems had now been solved, but that the solutions were “of too advanced a nature to be presented to the general reader,” who was therefore obliged to conclude that “it would all be quite clear to me if I knew as much about these things as Lord Russell.”
“The older I grow the more I realize how terribly difficult it is for people to understand each other,” Wittgenstein wrote.
Sometimes Russell’s loftiness declined into “facetiousness.” He made fun of the biblical Jews, who were willing to die for the sake of a belief in “circumcision and the wickedness of eating pork”—but, as Smythies observed, he never asked himself the question, “what is it like to believe what a Jew of that time believed?” He also stated that the idea of “self” or “subject” had been “banished” by Hume—an “important advance,” apparently, because it meant “abolishing all supposed knowledge of the ‘soul,’” thus destroying one of the pillars of religion and metaphysics. But he could not explain what the “important advance” consisted in: what had “the idea of the self” meant before it was “banished,” Smythies asked, and in any case “how can one know what the idea of the self is which one can’t have, unless one has that idea?”
The main point was that Russell was incapable of giving weight, depth or color to ideas that differed from his own: his book was a massive monologue, without variety of voices or plurality of points of view. His summaries of the great philosophers made them all look “faintly absurd”—either ridiculous like Pythagoras, or dishonest like Plato, or insane like the German idealists and Nietzsche—and he made no attempt to explain what they might have meant to those who found them life-changingly significant. Philosophical differences were erased, and the resulting narrative was stale, flat, barren and uninteresting. “People’s lives and ideas, served up in this way, become unattractive and insipid,” as Smythies put it; and “the most positive taste one gets . . . is that of Lord Russell’s prose (which has a tinny, flat quality peculiar to itself).” Wittgenstein could not disagree: “have read your review,” he told Smythies, “and it isn’t bad.”
*
The review echoed a theme that Wittgenstein had been working with for almost 40 years: that philosophy “gives no pictures of reality” and should therefore be located—as he said to Russell in 1913—“over or under, but not beside, the natural sciences.” Philosophy as he saw it was “not a theory,” but the practice of clarifying thoughts that are otherwise “opaque and blurred.”
Wittgenstein’s Tractatus had been, amongst other things, a response to the problem of making sense of nonsense: its propositions were steps leading to a utopia where the clamor of senselessness would yield to perpetual peace. After a while, however, Wittgenstein had lost interest in a realm where “conditions are ideal,” and when he started teaching in Cambridge he decided to concentrate not on the “crystalline purity of logic” but on the obscurities and confusions of everyday life. “We need friction,” he said: “back to the rough ground!” He advised his students to “pay attention” to their nonsense, and attended to his own in his notebooks and in drafts of what he hoped would be his second book.
He was still impressed by the fact that, as he put it, “something can look like a sentence we understand, and yet yield no sense,” and he still thought of philosophy as “the uncovering of one or another piece of plain nonsense.” But he realized that the task of clarification was complex: “philosophy unties knots in our thinking,” and “the philosophizing has to be as complicated as the knots it unties.” It was also riddled with paradox. “When a sentence is called senseless,” he said, “a combination of words is being excluded from the language, withdrawn from circulation,” and “it is not as it were its sense that is senseless.” But we cannot appreciate what we have achieved unless we find some way to commemorate our lost illusions and “get a clear view of the . . . state of affairs before the contradiction was resolved”—a task that called for imagination, tact and poetic skill rather than quick-witted cleverness.
Early in 1950, Norman Malcolm alerted the Rockefeller Foundation to the fact that Wittgenstein was ill, that he had masses of unpublished manuscripts, and that he was short of money. The official who took charge of the case, Chadbourne Gilpatric, was prepared to give him whatever he needed, but Wittgenstein was uneasy: he knew too many examples of people who, like Russell, did excellent work when young, but “very dull work indeed when they got old,” and he did not want to be one of them. Gilpatric would not be put off, however, and in January 1951 he came to Oxford to press his case. At one point he offered some “patter,” as Wittgenstein called it, about language and philosophy, but after that he “talked sense,” offering to pay for the printing of Wittgenstein’s papers, because “the world needed them badly.” Wittgenstein was not convinced: “but see,” as he said to Gilpatric, “I write one sentence, and then I write another—just the opposite . . . and which shall stand?”
A few days later, Wittgenstein drew up a simple will. He bequeathed a few things he loved (a clock, an edition of Lessing’s religious writings, and a volume of Grimm’s fairy tales) to various close friends, while the “Collection of Nonsense” was entrusted to Rhees. Another paragraph asked that the “unpublished writings” be given to Rhees and two other friends—Anscombe and von Wright—who were to “publish as many . . . as they think fit.” The archive proved to be far larger than they had imagined, and they embarked on a lengthy process of posthumous publication; but it was clear that the starting point had to be the typescript on language games that he had been toying with since before the war, and it appeared (with parallel English translation) as the first part of Philosophical Investigations in 1953.
Wittgenstein once told Con Drury that if the book needed a motto, he would use a quotation from King Lear: “I’ll teach you differences.” He was impressed, as he said to another friend, by the human capacity for incomprehension and dissent, and the improbability of any ultimate resolution.
The older I grow the more I realize how terribly difficult it is for people to understand each other, and I think that what misleads one is the fact that they all look so much like each other. If some people looked like elephants and others like cats, or fish, one wouldn’t expect them to understand each other and things would look much more like what they really are.
In the event the Investigations was published without a motto, though Wittgenstein had another one in reserve, from a song by Irving Berlin: “you’d be surprised.” Alternatively he would resort to one of the oldest proverbs in the English language—“a very beautiful and kindly saying” as he called it—“it takes many sorts to make a world.”


Aug 30, 2018

Is there a rhinoceros in the room? One of the earliest encounters between Bertrand Russell and the young Ludwig Wittgenstein involved a discussion about whether there was a rhinoceros in their room. Apparently, when Wittgenstein 'refused to admit that it was certain that there was not a rhinoceros in the room,' Russell half-jokingly looked underneath the desks to prove it. But to no avail. 'My German engineer, I think, is a fool,' concluded Russell. 'He thinks nothing empirical is knowable-I asked him to admit that there was not a rhinoceros in the room, but he wouldn't.'[1]
The crux of the dispute appears to be a thesis held by Wittgenstein at the time concerning 'asserted propositions.' According to Russell, Wittgenstein maintained that 'there is nothing in the world except asserted propositions' and refused 'to admit the existence of anything except asserted propositions.'[2] But what this thesis amounts to and how it is related to his remarks about nothing empirical being knowable and about whether there is a rhinoceros in the room is difficult to determine. For one thing, it is difficult to see how Wittgenstein could be arguing that nothing empirical is knowable given the central importance for his early thinking of his idea that only propositions of natural science can be said. For another, his reported claim that there is nothing in the world except asserted propositions is hard to square with his contention in the 'Notes on Logic' that there are only unasserted propositions. What we need is an interpretation that can make sense of Wittgenstein's reported remarks, while taking into account their relation to his fundamental ideas and his views in the 'Notes on Logic' and elsewhere. Also, it must offer some account of Russell's extreme reaction to Wittgenstein and his worry that Wittgenstein may have been a fool.
In his recent biography, Wittgenstein: A Life, Brian McGuinness proposes an interesting interpretation of Russell and Wittgenstein's conversation, one echoed by Ray Monk in his Wittgenstein: The Duty of Genius. In what follows, I criticize McGuinness' interpretation and in its place propose an alternative way of reading 'asserted proposition.' This alternative provides us with a way of seeing Wittgenstein's earliest thoughts as continuous with fundamental insights expressed not only in the Tractatus, but in his later philosophy as well. Indeed, if I am right, Wittgenstein's objection to Russell anticipates ideas normally associated with On Certainty.[3]
McGuinness' interpretation depends on sorting out what Wittgenstein meant by an 'asserted proposition' and why he thought that Russell's remark about the rhinoceros did not qualify as one. To this end, he insists that we must see Wittgenstein's objection as expressing a thesis that is more adequately expressed in the Tractatus. This thesis, says McGuinness, concerns the logical composition of the world. His view is that 'the claim that only asserted propositions exist is clearly intended as a correction of Moore's position in his 1899 article [`The Nature of Judgement'] according to which the world is formed of concepts.'[4] According to McGuinness, Wittgenstein's correction is based on the idea that the world consists of facts-facts being asserted propositions-not of things or what Moore called simple concepts. The correction thus seems to anticipate the idea that 'the world is the totality of facts, not of things,' the second remark of the Tractatus.[5]
McGuinness reminds us that the phrase 'asserted proposition' is central to the accounts of the nature of a proposition defended by Russell and Moore, accounts that Wittgenstein is practically certain to have known about. The situation, as McGuinness has it, is that Wittgenstein had already formed an objection to Russell and Moore, which he then attempted to express in his conversation with Russell. In sum, McGuinness assumes that Wittgenstein meant by the phrase 'asserted proposition' what Russell and Moore had meant by it.[6]
The notion of an 'asserted proposition' is connected with Russell and Moore's belief that the content of a proposition is its essential feature and their view that the psychological processes involved in judgments concerning this content have a secondary status. On their conception, a proposition is not a psychic phenomenon as it is for Locke but rather is what Lockean ideas and the like are about.[7] Moore called the entities that make up propositions 'concepts' and Russell called them 'terms.' A proposition, on this view, is what Moore took to be a complex or what Russell called a set of terms. It is not something mental, but rather a complex or collection of subsistent, Platonic, entities.
On Russell and Moore's conception, facts are identified with true propositions. Truth is not-as it is on the correspondence theory-a relationship between a proposition (considered as a mental or linguistic entity) and something else. Rather it is a property of a proposition, now considered as a complex or configuration of terms. Some proposition just happens to be true, and those propositions are facts. As Moore says,
Once it is definitely recognized that the proposition is to denote not a belief (in the psychological sense), nor a form of words, but the object of belief, it seems plain that it differs in no respect from the reality to which it is supposed merely to correspond, i.e. the truth that 'I exist' differs in no respect from the corresponding reality 'my existence.' [8]
What differentiates a true proposition, or a fact, from a false proposition is the quality it has of 'being asserted.' Russell says,
True and false propositions alike are in some sense entities, and are in some sense capable of being logical subjects; but when a proposition happens to be true, it has a further quality over and above that which it shares with false propositions, and it is this further quality which is what I mean by assertion in a logical as opposed to a psychological sense.[9]
An asserted proposition, then, is Russell's term for differentiating a true proposition, a fact, from a false proposition; true propositions have the property of 'being asserted,' which false propositions lack.
McGuinness thinks that Wittgenstein was harking back to this use of the phrase 'asserted proposition' in his conversation with Russell. He thinks that by saying 'there is nothing in the world except asserted propositions,' Wittgenstein was intending to challenge Russell and Moore's basic assumption that there was something more fundamental than facts. On the view being attributed to Wittgenstein, false propositions are not 'entities,' as Russell and Moore believed; there is not a complex of terms (or concepts) in virtue of which something is not; the world is composed of facts, not of terms, concepts, or things.
For McGuinness, then, the discussion between Wittgenstein and Russell amounted to the question 'What complex can reasonably be supposed to exist in virtue of there not being a rhinoceros in the room?'[10] He holds that Russell was of the view that such a complex existed, whereas Wittgenstein in arguing that there was nothing except asserted propositions, was denying this claim. As McGuinness puts it,
[Wittgenstein was] denying existence in this sense to everything except asserted propositions or facts. Thus he had already reached the position expressed in the first propositions of the Tractatus that the world consists of facts . . . [and that] things, objects, or what Moore called simple concepts do not go to make up the world.'[11]
In spite of McGuinness' insistence that Wittgenstein's remark was 'clearly intended' as a correction of Moore's position, we must surely regard his interpretation as conjectural. Other than the appearance of the phrase 'asserted proposition,' there is no direct evidence to be found in Russell's letters to Lady Ottoline to suggest that the two men were discussing Moore's article or indeed any of Moore's or Russell's earlier views. In fact, if we are to discern anything definite on the basis of Russell's letters, it is that Russell was worried about whether the two men were discussing anything at all; what emerges from his reports to Lady Ottoline is not that Russell was alarmed by what Wittgenstein was saying but rather by whether he was saying anything.
These conversations, it must be remembered, occurred very early in their relationship, in fact within the first three weeks or so after they met. At this stage, Wittgenstein's intellectual credentials were not yet clear to Russell and he worries that Wittgenstein may be 'a fool,' 'an infliction,' and 'a crank.'[12] McGuinness' claim that Wittgenstein's remark 'was clearly intended as a correction of Moore's position' does not take into account the serious doubts Russell had about Wittgenstein; it presumes that the framework of discussion between the two men was much more settled than appears to have been the case.[13]
This point is especially telling given that the position McGuinness attributes to Wittgenstein was, as McGuinness himself points out, already considered and rejected by Russell in his discussion of Meinong.[l4] If McGuinness is right, it is extremely puzzling how Wittgenstein's proposing a sophisticated view about the nature of false propositions and complexes which Russell had earlier considered and rejected could have driven Russell to suspect that Wittgenstein may have been, not merely wrong, but rather a fool and an infliction and a crank. Even if Wittgenstein had articulated his position poorly, Russell would presumably have (at the very least) been able to recognize the possibility of a position he had earlier considered.
Another serious difficulty with McGuinness's interpretation is that Wittgenstein states in the 'Notes on Logic' of 1913 that 'there are only unasserted propositions.'[15] If Wittgenstein's remarks to Russell about asserted propositions anticipate the opening remarks of the Tractatus, we must suppose that Wittgenstein changed his mind between 1911 and 1913, and then changed it back again by the time of writing the Tractatus. Besides being implausible, this runs counter to a fact that McGuinness himself uses to support his contention that the early conversation anticipated ideas later expressed in the Tractatus, namely that Wittgenstein claimed that his fundamental ideas came to him very early.[16] The continuity in Wittgenstein's thinking makes it even more difficult to see how Wittgenstein could have changed his mind about 'asserted propositions' and yet have had the same ideas in 1911 and 1918. At the very least, if McGuinness is to appeal to the continuity between Wittgenstein's earlier and later remarks, he owes us an account of the remarks from the 'Notes on Logic' concerning unasserted propositions.
A further difficulty with McGuinness' reading is his failure to offer an account of Wittgenstein's remark that 'nothing empirical is knowable' and how it squares with Wittgenstein's idea that only propositions of natural science can be said. Indeed, McGuinness argues that any conclusions about our knowledge that Wittgenstein drew from his view about the contents of the world is too 'conjectural' and cannot be stated 'without falling into confusion with different and more usual assumptions about the nature of propositions.'[17] On McGuinness' account, then, an important piece of the puzzle concerning that early conversation remains essentially unaccounted for.
Finally, on McGuinness' interpretation, remarks from the Tractatus, such as 'the world consists of facts, not of things' are assumed to be ontological claims, ontological claims anticipated by Wittgenstein in his conversation with Russell. McGuinness' view is that Wittgenstein was 'correcting Moore,' both in the opening remarks of the Tractatus
and in his earlier objection to Russell. This suggests that Wittgenstein, Moore, and Russell shared a similar program: to offer an account of the furniture of the world. Where they differed, thinks McGuinness, was only over whether the furniture consisted of facts (or asserted propositions) or, concepts.[18]
However, the logical status of the opening remarks concerning the world and facts, and indeed the status of all the remarks of the Tractatus, has by no means been settled. Indeed, it is clear that for Wittgenstein the question 'What does the world consist of?' is in some sense illegitimate and nonsensical, and so too are the propositions that are proposed as answers to it. Moreover, Wittgenstein makes it abundantly clear that his aim is not to propound philosophical doctrines, but to show that such doctrines stem from a misunderstanding of the logic of the language.[19] By taking Wittgenstein to have been proposing ontological theses (even if these theses are seen as undermining all such theses) McGuinness downplays the centrality of Wittgenstein's antitheoretical remarks [20]
In sum, McGuinness' interpretation fails to deal adequately with Russell and Wittgenstein's early conversation. Not only does it fail to account for Russell's extreme reaction, it attributes a view to Wittgenstein concerning asserted propositions which is inconsistent with the views that he expressed shortly afterwards. As well, McGuinness presents very little explanation of Wittgenstein's reported remark that 'nothing empirical is knowable' and how this squares with his idea that only propositions of natural science can be said. Finally, McGuinness' interpretation assumes that Wittgenstein's interest lies in proposing philosophical theories, an idea which runs counter to a fundamental theme of his early (and later) philosophy.
As a first step towards clarifying Wittgenstein's objection to Russell, it is helpful to distinguish two uses that Wittgenstein makes of 'assertion' in the 'Notes on Logic,' notes written within two years of that early conversation. In one use, Wittgenstein speaks of 'assertion' when criticizing what he takes as Russell's confusion of the logical with the psychological. He says,
Judgment, question and command are all on the same level. What interests logic in them is only the unasserted proposition.
There are only unasserted propositions. Assertion is merely psychological. [21]
In this use, Wittgenstein criticizes Russell and Frege for confusing the psychological aspect of asserting something with the logical properties of a proposition. For Wittgenstein, assertion isn't a property of a proposition, as it is for Russell, and when we disentangle assertion from the real logical properties of a proposition, we are left only with 'unasserted propositions.' For our purposes, the important thing to see is that Wittgenstein's only use for 'assertion' in Russell's sense is critical. At this stage he would not have said that 'there are only asserted propositions' meaning by 'asserted proposition' what Russell meant by it. For that would presuppose that he thought that 'asserted proposition' expresses a coherent concept, contrary to the argument of the 'Notes on Logic.'
In his second use, Wittgenstein speaks of 'assertion' in the context of determining what cannot be asserted, of indicating what it would be meaningless to assert. Thus Wittgenstein says 'A proposition cannot possibly assert of itself that it is true.' He says,
Russell's 'complexes' were to have the useful property of being compounded, and were to combine with this the agreeable property that they could be treated like 'simples.' But this alone made them unserviceable as logical types, since there would have been significance in asserting of a simple, that it was complex.
As well, he declares,
Types can never be distinguished from each other by saying (as is often done) that one has these but the other has those properties, for this presupposes that there is a meaning in asserting all these properties of both types.[22]
In the 'Notes Dictated to G. E. Moore in Norway,' written in 1914, Wittgenstein again uses this second sense of assertion when he speaks of 'what is sought to be expressed by the nonsensical assertion' of Russell's theory of types.[23]
It is clear then that in the 'Notes on Logic' Wittgenstein thought Russell's notion of 'assertion' to be incoherent and that this belief is related to his concern with what can be meaningfully asserted, with his use of assertion in the second sense mentioned. If the 'Notes on Logic' give any clues as to what Wittgenstein might have meant in his early conversation with Russell, the evidence is thus against his having used 'asserted proposition' in Russell's sense, In fact, if we stress the continuity of his ideas, it is likely that he would have been opposed to the terminology of asserted propositions in Russell's sense. For, as, he said, Russell's sense of assertion is psychological, despite what Russell himself believed, and betrays a confusion about the nature of a proposition. What is more likely is that Wittgenstein was using 'assertion' in the sense of determining what counts as a meaningful assertion or not.
If we follow out the hypothesis that by 'assertion' Wittgenstein was concerned with meaning in his conversation with Russell, an interesting line of interpretation comes into focus. For we are able to see Wittgenstein's objection to Russell as questioning whether Russell's proposition that 'there is no rhinoceros in the room' meaningfully asserts anything. On this interpretation, in saying 'there is nothing in the world except asserted propositions,' Wittgenstein is arguing that Russell's proposition, that there is no rhinoceros in the room, only appears to assert something, but in fact does not. Since Russell's proposition does not assert anything, the utterance makes no sense for the simple reason that only propositions that assert something make sense. Russell's proposition about the rhinoceros would thus represent what Wittgenstein called in 'Notes Dictated to G. E. Moore in Norway,' a 'nonsensical assertion,' and what he called in the Tractatus, a 'nonsensical pseudoproposition.'[24]
In opposition to McGuinness, I am saying that the notion of an 'asserted proposition' that Wittgenstein was employing in his conversation with Russell may have been radically different from what Moore and Russell meant by it. Far from Wittgenstein embracing Russell and Moore's conception of the proposition, he may have been challenging it on the grounds that Russell had confused nonsensical pseudopropositions with propositions proper. On this interpretation, he was challenging the very framework with which Russell and Moore pursued their investigations into the nature of proposition. He was not working within their framework and 'correcting Moore,' as McGuinness assumes, but aiming to undercut it.
The main difficulty for this line of interpretation is that there doesn't seem to be anything problematic about Russell's statement about the rhinoceros. 'Of course,' we want to say, 'there is no rhinoceros in Russell and Wittgenstein's room'; 'of course the proposition 'there is no rhinoceros in the room' can be asserted.' Indeed, if Russell's room was at all like ours, what could be a better example of a true proposition? How, then, can it be suggested that Wittgenstein thinks such a statement to be a nonsensical pseudoproposition?
Before agreeing, however, that 'there is no rhinoceros in the room' obviously counts as a meaningful assertion, we should pause and consider Wittgenstein's much later remarks in On Certainty, in which Wittgenstein argues that 'propositions' remarkably similar to Russell's proposition about the rhinoceros are nonsensical. Some examples are: 'Here is a hand,' 'I know that there is a chair over there,' 'The earth existed long before one's birth,' 'I am here.' These apparent 'assertions' are grist for Wittgenstein's mill in On Certainty, and are seemingly at least as commonsensical and undeniable as Russell's assertion that 'there is no rhinoceros in the room.'
Part of Wittgenstein's story in On Certainty is that these so-called assertions, which appear to be about the way the world is, are assertions 'about' how we talk about the world, about the logic of the world, not assertions about the world at all. Moore thinks, for example, that he knows that he has a hand and that 'I have a hand' is an assertion about the world. But for Wittgenstein such a proposition is not an assertion, but 'stands fast' for us when we make assertions about the world. He says, for instance,
I should like to say: Moore does not know what he asserts he knows, but it stands fast for him, as also for me; regarding it as absolutely solid is part of our method of doubt and enquiry.[25]
Insofar as Moore intends us to believe that his proposition is something that we can know and assert, Wittgenstein regards it as nonsensical. In his 'misfiring attempt,' Moore is, says Wittgenstein, trying to describe what 'belong[s] to our frame of reference. '[26] That is, he is enumerating propositions that are true only in the sense that if they did not hold, we would lose our standards of correct judgment:
We are interested in the fact that about certain empirical propositions no doubt can exist if making judgments is to be possible at all. Or again: I am inclined to believe that not everything that has the form of an empirical proposition is one.[27]
Interestingly, Wittgenstein harks back to the terminology of the Tractatus and of his earlier writings to make his point about what can be asserted. He says, for instance,
My life shews that I know or am certain that there is a chair over there, or a door, and so on.-I tell a friend e.g. 'Take that chair over there,' 'Shut the door,' etc. etc.[28]
Wittgenstein thinks it makes sense to say 'take that chair over there,' but that it makes no sense (at least under normal circumstances) to assert 'there is a chair over there.' This last assertion may appear commonsensical but it cannot, says Wittgenstein, be meaningfully asserted. For him, only the former remark can be asserted; we might say that, despite appearances to the contrary, 'there is a chair over there,' taken as a straightforward assertion, 'does not exist.'
There is a relationship, however, between so-called 'facts' such as 'I have a hand' and my saying 'I have hurt my hand.' The former is shown in my saying the latter; that I have a hand is presupposed and forms the 'background' for the assertion 'I have hurt my hand.'[29] But precisely because it forms the background, it makes no sense on Wittgenstein's account to assert or say anything about it.
When we keep the remarks of On Certainty in mind, our initial assumption that 'there is no rhinoceros in the room' is a perfectly legitimate thing to say, begins to waiver. The issue for us, then, is not whether we can question the meaning of such propositions, for, as we have seen, propositions like Russell's are exactly the type that Wittgenstein spends so much time criticizing in his later philosophy. Rather, the question is whether Wittgenstein in his early philosophy and in particular in his conversation with Russell was making discriminations between propositions like those he makes in On Certainty. The question is whether Wittgenstein, in his early conversation with Russell, already had a sense of what counted as a proposition, as opposed to what belonged to the 'background' for making propositions. Is it plausible to think that Wittgenstein regarded Russell's claim that 'there is no rhinoceros in the room' as a 'background proposition' which Russell had unwittingly assimilated to an everyday proposition? And is it plausible to think that in responding that 'there is nothing in the world except asserted propositions' Wittgenstein intended to point out to Russell that what Russell thought were propositions about the world were in fact not propositions at all?
On this interpretation, Wittgenstein was protesting that 'propositions' about the 'background' are not propositions or assertions at all and that the only kind of propositions that exist are the everyday ones used in everyday life, propositions like those of natural science referred to in the Tractatus, which have 'nothing to do with philosophy' and are the only ones that can be said.[30] An 'asserted proposition' is, on this reading, something like a proposition used in everyday situations, something that can be said to be true or false, to be bipolar, to say something, to have a use. By contrast, Russell's statement, being about the background for asserting propositions in everyday situations, does not qualify as an asserted proposition since it cannot be said to be true or false and is not bipolar.[31]
Wittgenstein did not use the phrase 'background' in the Tractatus or in his earlier notes but he had the means for distinguishing sense and nonsense which lies behind that later idea. Specifically, his idea of the 'Form der Abbildung' or form of representation of a picture and hence of a proposition anticipates his later idea of a 'background.'[32] Stated in these terms, the trouble with Russell's assertion about the rhinoceros is that it purports to represent something that cannot be represented, something that belongs to the form of representation.[33] From Wittgenstein's point of view, Russell has 'inflated' the proposition about the rhinoceros and created an 'illusion of a perspective' in which he appears to be making a claim about the world. While under this illusion, Russell does not even contemplate that his proposition could be anything other than a straightforward everyday assertion.[34]
This reading of the early conversation has the advantage of dovetailing with Russell's report that Wittgenstein 'thinks nothing empirical is knowable.' If Russell took 'propositions' about the form of representation as empirical propositions, then he would have quite naturally interpreted Wittgenstein's objection as a rejection of empirical propositions as such. But Wittgenstein was not rejecting empirical propositions; he would have accepted propositions like 'the chair in the other room is black' as empirical and knowable. Rather, he was rejecting propositions that purported to be empirical propositions, but were not. Likewise, we can make sense of Russell's later recollection that Wittgenstein 'maintained that all existential propositions are meaningless.' Again, Wittgenstein would not have had any problem in accepting 'there is a black chair in the other room' as a meaningful existential proposition. Rather it was Russell's purported proposition that 'there is no rhinoceros in the room' that he considered to be meaningless.[35]
We can also make better sense of Russell's extreme reaction to Wittgenstein, and why he suspected that Wittgenstein may have been a fool, infliction, and crank. For Russell would have had, as indeed anyone who has read Wittgenstein's On Certainty is sure to have had, a feeling of bafflement that such apparently innocent 'propositions' as 'here is a hand' could be viewed as objectionable. Indeed, it is important to emphasize how natural Russell's response is. After all, most of us would not have any problem thinking that 'there is no rhinoceros in the room' is true. All that we have to do is look about our room and it seems absolutely certain that there is no rhinoceros in it.
True, in philosophy classes we do indeed raise skeptical questions about such beliefs. But Russell gives no indication in his reports of their conversations that he and Wittgenstein were following in the skeptic's well-trodden path. In fact, Russell differed from Wittgenstein in regarding skepticism as a genuine, if mistaken, position and his reaction would surely have been less extreme had Wittgenstein been arguing a skeptical position.[38] Russell's ridiculing of Wittgenstein by looking underneath the desks in the room seems more connected with his dismissing Wittgenstein as a crank than it does with his rejecting an implausible skeptical argument. Moreover, we must not forget that Wittgenstein's objection to the rhinoceros remark was part and parcel of his positive contention that 'there is nothing in the world except asserted propositions'; this does not sound like the remark of a skeptic. (And remember too that, according to Russell's later anecdote, his objection concerned the meaning of existential propositions.) In short, it would seem that Wittgenstein was making a point about what can be meaningfully said, not about what we don't know.
It is unlikely, then, that what annoyed Russell was that Wittgenstein was venturing a skeptical hypothesis. What is more likely is that he was annoyed - to the point of suspecting that Wittgenstein may have been a fool, infliction, and crank - with Wittgenstein's actually objecting to his apparently innocent assertion that there was not a rhinoceros in the room. On my interpretation, Wittgenstein was questioning the sense of Russell's statement insofar as it pretended to be a species of an everyday assertion. And it is no more immediately obvious why there could be anything objectionable about the sense of the proposition about the rhinoceros than it is obvious that there is something objectionable about the sense of the proposition that, say, 'I know that I've never been to the moon.'[37]
So, if Wittgenstein's objection to Russell was indeed motivated by a concern with nonsense of the sort discussed in On Certainty and elsewhere,[38] there is a significant line of continuity between his views expressed in his first meetings with Russell and the very last days of his life. Establishing this line of continuity, however, requires our recognizing a much greater gap between the early Wittgenstein and Russell (and Frege) than is ordinarily seen. Another way of saying this is that if the Tractatus is to be interpreted as expressing a concern with nonsense, as Diamond and others have argued, we must be willing to take a serious second look at the development of these ideas in his early 'collaboration' with Russell. To this end, it is worth remembering what it was that Russell said Wittgenstein refused to admit in that earliest of conversations, namely that 'it was certain that there was not a rhinoceros in the room.'[39]

NOTES
1 Information about Russell and Wittgenstein's conversation is derived from two main sources: Russell's letters to Lady Ottoline Morell and Russell's article in Mind, printed on the occasion of Wittgenstein's death. The first appearance of Wittgenstein is recorded in Russell's letter of the 18th of October, 1911, and the discussion about the rhinoceros appears in his letters written between the 19th of October and the 2nd of November.
It is interesting to note that in his article in Mind, Russell says that the discussion concerned a hippopotamus, not a rhinoceros. Also, Russell's claim to have looked underneath the desks does not appear in his letters to Lady Ottoline Morell. See Bertrand Russell, 'Ludwig Wittgenstein,' Mind 60 (1951), 297-298. Russell's letters were reprinted in Brian McGuinness, Wittgenstein: A Life (Berkeley and Los Angeles: The University of California Press, 1988), 88-89 and Ray Monk, Wittgenstein: The Duty of Genius (London: Vintage, 1990), 38-40. The quotations are from McGuinness, p. 89.
2 Wittgenstein's reported remarks about 'asserted propositions' occur in Russell's letters of the 7th and 13th of November, 1911. See Monk, p. 40.
3 My objective is to raise questions about McGuinness's hypothesis so as to suggest an alternative way of reading Wittgenstein's earliest remarks. I am not claiming to offer a definitive interpretation of that early conversation. As McGuinness points out, there is too little information for that to be possible.
4 McGuinness, p. 91.
5 Ludwig Wittgenstein, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicua, D. F. Pears and B. F. McGuinness (trans.) (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1961), remark 1.1.
6 Nicholas Griffin echoes McGuinness' interpretation: 'We do know that Wittgenstein at one point defended the views that no empirical propositions are knowable and that the only things that exist are asserted propositions. Few conclusions about Wittgenstein's philosophy can be drawn from these remarks, except that the second of the them is based on Russell's account of asserted propositions in The Principles of Mathematics.' See Nicholas Griffin, 'Ludwig in Fact and Fiction,' The Journal of the Bertrand Russell Archives 12 (1992), 79-93. The quotation is from p. 89.
7 It must be kept in mind that though Moore develops his realist conception of the proposition in opposition to Bradley's idealism, his version of realism is also antithetical to the conception of ideas derived from British Empiricism. For more on this topic see John Passmore, A Hundred Years of Philosophy (Harmondsworth: Penguin Books, 1966), 202-204. For a detailed analysis of the realist reaction to idealism, see Peter Hylton,
Russell, Idealism and the Emergence of Analytic Philosophy (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1990).
8 The quotation is from Paesmore, p. 203.
9 Bertrand Russell, The Principles of Mathematics (New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1938), 49.
10 McGuinness, p. 91.
11 Ibid.
12 McGuinness, p. 89. Russell's later anecdote about the rhinoceros conversation sheds light on his earlier misgivings about Wittgenstein. He says, 'quite at first I was in doubt as to whether he was a man of genius or a crank, but I very soon decided in favour of the former alternative. Some of his early views made the decision difficult. He maintained, for example, at one time that all existential propositions are meaningless.' Note that Russell says that Wittgenstein maintained that 'all existential propositions are meaningless' whereas in his letter to Lady Ottoline at the time, he says that Wittgenstein 'thinks nothing empirical is knowable.' As I shall suggest, Russell's later remark about propositions being 'meaningless' as opposed to being knowable, is closer to the heart of the issue, though it is quite likely that in Russell's mind little rested on these different formulations. See McGuinness, p. 89.
13 The conversation in which, according to another of Russell's famous anecdotes, Wittgenstein asks Russell whether he (Wittgenstein) is 'utterly hopeless at philosophy' and thus whether he should go into aeronautics or philosophy was not to take place until November 27, 1911, more than three weeks after the rhinoceros conversation. In response to Wittgenstein's question, Russell says 'I told him I didn't know but I thought not. I asked him to bring me something written to help me to judge.' It would seem that three weeks after the rhinoceros conversation, Russell was still having doubts. See Monk, p. 40.
14 McGuinness, p. 90.
15 Ludwig Wittgenstein, 'Notes on Logic,' Notebooks 1914-1916, 2nd rev. ed., G. H. von Wright and G. E. M. Anscombe (ed.) G. E. M. Anscombe (trans.) (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1961), 95. Both the 'Notes on Logic' and the 'Notes Dictated to G. E. Moore in Norway' are printed in Notebooks 1914-16. Hereafter, I shall refer simply to 'Notes on Logic' or 'Notes Dictated to G. E. Moore in Norway' followed by the page number as it occurs in Notebooks 1914-16.
16 See M. O'C. Drury, 'Conversations with Wittgenstein,' in R. Rhees (ed.), Recollections of Wittgenstein (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1984), 158: 'my fundamental ideas came to me very early in life.'
17 McGuinness, p. 92.
18 When I insist that McGuinness has an ontological reading of the Tractatus, I am saying that he thinks Wittgenstein is (at least initially) presenting an account of the nature of language and of the world (and so in that broad sense is similar to Russell and Moore). I am aware that McGuinness differs from most interpreters in holding that the ultimate purpose of Wittgenstein's aims is to show the absurdity of all such accounts. Nevertheless, on McGuinness' interpretation, success in showing the absurdity of philosophical accounts of language and the world must rest on our understanding of the correctness of the account Wittgenstein initially presents. In other words, we must understand and be assured that Wittgenstein's (linguistic) ontology is correct before we can draw the consequence of ultimate 'unsayableness.' In my view, to interpret Wittgenstein in this manner is to admit that he has a doctrine after all, even if this doctrine cannot properly be said, contrary to Wittgenstein's disclaimer about philosophical doctrines. For more on McOuinneas' view,
see Brian McGuinness, 'Language and Reality in the Tractatus,' Teoria (1985), 135-144.
19 See, e.g., Tractatus, p. 3, 4.003, 4.112, and 6.53. This rejection of philosophical theories appears in the 'Notes on Logic' as well as in the 7ractatus. See p. 106 where Wittgenstein says 'In philosophy there are no deductions; it is purely descriptive' and 'Philosophy gives no pictures of reality.'
20 Another way of saying this is that McGuinness has not taken seriously enough the question raised by Cora Diamond concerning how to read the Tractatus without 'chickening out.' If, as Wittgenstein says, his own propositions are nonsensical, it is difficult to make sense of how Wittgenstein can be offering an account of language and reality, whether that account be linguistic or otherwise. ff-Diamond is right, the status of the propositions of the Tractatus is altogether different from what McGuinness supposes. See Cora Diamond, The Realistic Spirit (Cambridge, Massachusetts: The M. I. T. Press, 1991), 179-204.
21 Wittgenstein, 'Notes on Logic' pp. 95 and 96.
22 'Notes on Logic,' p. 103 and pp. 100-101 (my emphasis in the case of both occurrences of 'asserting' and in the case of 'significance').
23 Wittgenstein, 'Notes dictated to G. E. Moore in Norway' p. 110.
24 'Notes dictated to G. E. Moore in Norway' p. 110 and Tractatua, 4.1272.
25 Ludwig Wittgenstein, On Certainty (New York: Harper & Row, 1969), paragraph 151.
26 On Certainty, paragraphs 37 & 83.
27 On Certainty, paragraph 309.
28 On Certainty, paragraph 7.
29 On Certainty, paragraph 94.
30 Tractatua, 6.53.
31 In his later philosophy, a statement about the background would be considered a rule of grammar. In this connection, it is interesting to note that in a lecture in the early 1930s, Wittgenstein discussed 'the changes that would be required by accepting the hypothesis [i.e., by taking it as a rule of grammar] that there is a hippopotamus in the room.' Wittgenstein's point is that accepting 'there is a hippopotamus in our room' as a rule of grammar, as something belonging to the 'background' would radically upset our ordinary way of seeing things; it would necessitate, as he says, 'queer alterations.' Though Wittgenstein does not explicitly mention it, it seems obvious that he thinks that we don't accept that proposition as a rule of grammar and that 'there is no hippopotamus in the room' is our accepted rule of grammar, and belongs to our form of representation. I might note that a distinguishing mark of the later Wittgenstein is that he sees propositions such as 'there is no hippopotamus in the room' as playing different roles, i.e., as rules of grammar or as empirical propositions, depending on the context. See Alice Ambrose (ed.), Wittgenstein's Lectures: Cambridge 1932-1935, (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1982), 70.
32 The expression 'Form der Abbildung' has been translated by Pears and McGuinness as 'pictorial form' and by Ogden and Ramsey as 'form of representation.' For the purposes at hand, I do not think much importance rests on distinguishing these two translations. I shall use 'form of representation' as it brings out more clearly Wittgenstein's interest in distinguishing the means of representation from what is represented. See Ludwig Wittgenstein, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, 2nd rev. ed., C. K. Ogden and F. P. Ramsey (trans.) (London: Routledge & Megan Paul, 1933), 2.15 and 2.17.
33 We can perhaps see elements of the idea that the form of representation cannot be represented anticipated in Wittgenstein's often mentioned use of the phrase 'form of a proposition' in the 'Notes on Logic.' For example, he criticizes Russell for confusing the form of a proposition for a thing. See 'Notes on Logic' p. 105. A full discussion of this idea of its origins in his early philosophy would take me too far afield.
34 The term 'illusion of a perspective' comes from Cora Diamond and refers to the illusion that she thinks is created in philosophy by propositions which strictly speaking are nonsense. I disagree, however, with her interpretation that for Wittgenstein these 'nonsense propositions' must be understood as containing signs that have not been given a meaning, e.g., 'Socrates is identical' is nonsense since 'identical' hasn't been given an adjectival meaning. In my view, Wittgenstein has a more robust conception of nonsense having to do with 'uninformativenem' and misconstruing the elements of our means of representation. Again, it would take me too far afield to defend this view here. See Diamond, p. 196.
35 Some years later, when Wittgenstein had an opportunity to explain the Tractatus to Russell in conversation, Russell disagreed with Wittgenstein's view that any assertion about the world was meaningless. During the discussion, Russell apparently took a sheet of white paper and made three blobs of ink on it and asked Wittgenstein to admit that since there were three blobs, there must be at least three things in the world. According to Russell, Wittgenstein 'would admit there were three blobs on the page, because that was a finite assertion, but he would not admit that anything at all could be said about the world as a whole.' Russell added, 'this part of his doctrine is to my mind definitely mistaken.' It is possible that what Wittgenstein means by a 'finite assertion' is similar to what I am suggesting he meant by an 'asserted proposition' in the early conversation under discussion and it may very well be that this later conversation is going over terrain similar to that covered in the early conversation Russell's remark is quoted in Monk, p. 182.
36 Recall that Wittgenstein says that 'scepticism is not irrefutable, but obviously nonsensical.' See Tractatus, 6.51.
37 On Certainty, paragraph 111.
38 To say that Wittgenstein's philosophy is similarly motivated in this regard is not to deny the substantial differences between his two philosophical periods. One thing we must avoid is the fallacy that Wittgenstein's criticisms of the Tractatus do not contain developments of views first expressed in the Tractatus, though perhaps in an inadequate form.
39 Emphasis added. I wish to thank Paul Genest, Paul Forster, and especially Andrew Lugg for their helpful comments. 


May 30, 2018





« De Superman à Wittgenstein » – les ressemblances de famille et imitations d’un célèbre dessin

 

 

Patrick Peccatte


En janvier 1933, l’écrivain Jerome « Jerry » Siegel et le dessinateur Joseph « Joe » Shuster créent une première version du personnage de Superman dans un fanzine confidentiel. Le personnage est cependant bien différent de l’icône culturelle connue actuellement puisqu’il s’agit d’un « villain »  , un héros chauve et méchant doté de super-pouvoirs et souhaitant assujettir le monde. Ce n’est que cinq ans plus tard que Superman devient le super-héros positif que l’on connaît, pourchassant les malfaiteurs et sauvant le monde. En 1938, Siegel et Shuster cèdent en effet le personnage à l’éditeur Detective Comics, Inc. (devenu par la suite DC Comics) qui lance alors au mois de juin un nouveau titre de comic book, Action Comics, où Superman tel qu’on le connaît désormais apparaît pour la première fois.
Action Comics #1, June 1938, couverture
Action Comics #1, June 1938, couverture
Cette couverture est devenue l’une des plus célèbres de l’histoire de la bande dessinée. Le numéro original est recherché par les collectionneurs fortunés et l’un des rares exemplaires qui subsiste encore actuellement a récemment atteint aux enchères une somme vertigineuse.

Le nom de Superman ne figure pas cependant sur la couverture du fascicule. Par contre, le premier super-héros de l’histoire des comics donne son nom à l’histoire sur 13 pages dont il est le protagoniste. La toute première page décrit d’emblée son origine extra-terrestre et ses super-pouvoirs; on notera que dans cette première version Superman n’est pas encore capable de voler…
La scène mémorable qui figure en couverture est explicitée en page 91.
Action Comics #1, June 1938, pages 1 et 9
Action Comics #1, June 1938, pages 1 et 9
En fait, cette couverture avait déjà été dévoilée le mois précédent dans une publicité parue dans More Fun Comics, un autre titre publié par Detective Comics. Là encore, le nom de Superman ne figure pas sur cette annonce, ce qui confirme que l’éditeur s’intéressait alors bien plus au lancement d’un nouveau titre qu’au nouveau personnage dont le succès sera pourtant rapidement considérable.
Publicité pour Action Comics #1 parue dans More Fun Comics #31, May 1938
Publicité pour Action Comics #1 parue dans More Fun Comics #31, May 1938
Quatre motifs graphiques et déjà une variante
Le dessin de cette couverture historique repose sur quatre motifs graphiques principaux:
  • la posture de Superman; corps incliné, bras au dessus de la tête, une jambe mi-fléchie, l’autre jambe en appui, indiquant que tout super-héros qu’il est, il est néanmoins représenté comme un humain « normal » dans l’effort;
  • la figuration de sa force colossale à travers une situation impossible dans le monde habituel: le fait qu’il soulève un objet volumineux et d’un poids considérable sans aucun effort apparent, contrastant par là avec l’attitude décrite précédemment et démontrant que sous une apparence humaine il est doté de capacités surhumaines (ses super-pouvoirs);
  • l’automobile inclinée portée à bout de bras, instanciation de l’objet très lourd et encombrant sur lequel s’exerce la force du super-héros; elle est violemment projetée contre un obstacle et l’avant de sa carrosserie est écrabouillé;
  • la composition; l’arrière-plan et l’avant-plan représentent les occupants de la voiture pourchassés par Superman. Ils sont effrayés et fuient la scène. Celui qui se tient la tête en bas à gauche en avant-plan est représenté partiellement (on sait qu’il s’agit des occupants de la voiture car dans la case précédente de la page 9, Superman a secoué la voiture pour les en extraire).
Le dessin de couverture et celui de la page 9 comportent cependant plusieurs différences significatives.
Comparaison entre le dessin de la page 9 et le dessin de couverture - Action Comics #1, June 1938
Comparaison entre le dessin de la page 9 et le dessin de couverture – Action Comics #1, June 1938
Nous savons depuis quelques années que la couverture a probablement été réalisée d’après l’histoire dessinée par Shuster et à la demande de l’éditeur par un ou plusieurs dessinateurs demeuré(s) anonyme(s). Cette hypothèse fort plausible a été émise lors de l’action en justice des héritiers de Siegel contre Warner Bros et DC Comics à propos du copyright sur le personnage de Superman2.
Voici les différences principales entre les deux dessins:
  • Superman ne prend pas appui sur la même jambe dans les deux dessins;
  • le ‘S‘ emblématique qui figure sur la poitrine du super-héros n’est pas apparent dans la case de la page 9 alors qu’il est bien visible sur la couverture;
  • il porte ses fameuses bottes rouges sur la couverture mais pas dans la case de l’histoire;
  • son ombre est plus longue sur la couverture;
  • le personnage en arrière-plan à droite près des rochers où la voiture est écrasée n’existe pas dans l’histoire, et d’ailleurs, les rochers n’ont pas le même aspect dans les deux dessins;
  • le personnage en avant-plan en bas à gauche n’a pas la même physionomie et la position de ses mains est différente (il applique ses mains sur ses oreilles dans l’histoire, sur ses tempes sur la couverture); de plus, il ne porte pas les mêmes vêtements et sa cravate a une position très différente dans les deux versions;
  • les vêtements du personnage en arrière-plan à gauche ne sont pas de la même couleur;
  • les proportions de Superman et des personnages sont identiques dans l’histoire, mais pas sur la couverture où Superman apparaît plus grand;
  • il existe plusieurs différences dans les représentations de la voiture, en particulier les protections des roues arrières ne sont pas identiques3; en outre, à la différence de sa représentation tronquée dans l’histoire, la voiture est visible intégralement sur la couverture et elle apparaît aussi légèrement plus inclinée;
  • la roue seule détachée de la voiture en bas à droite n’a pas la même position.
Ainsi donc, on peut considérer que le dessin original de Shuster et sa première réinterprétation créée à la demande de l’éditeur ont été publiés en même temps. Cette image est devenue fameuse et ses appropriations, imitations ou dérivations vont se multiplier. Cependant, le processus de multiplication des dessins dérivés sera long et passe par des images bien moins ressemblantes que ces deux variantes.
Conformément à un principe bien connu de la perception visuelle, si la comparaison entre deux images très proches incite à inventorier leurs différences, c’est bien plutôt leurs similarités, leurs ressemblances, voire leurs analogies qui sont pointées lorsqu’elles sont plus éloignées l’une de l’autre. L’analyse qui suit ne s’intéresse donc pas au petit jeu de la chasse aux écarts mais bien plutôt à la recherche de similarités visuelles et de ressemblances globales entre des images qui sont parfois assez dissemblables.
Pour ne pas trop alourdir cet article, nous désignerons désormais la couverture d’Action Comics #1 par l’acronyme AC1.
Imitations graphiques et ressemblances
Dans le domaine des comics, un « swipe » est une copie intentionnelle d’une couverture ou d’un dessin réalisée sans citer l’œuvre d’origine. Le procédé n’est pas toujours bien vu et le dessin nouveau, lorsque la ressemblance avec le dessin original est évidente, est qualifié quelquefois de clone, copie, réplique, imitation, appropriation, plagiat, etc., de pastiche ou parodie lorsque la connotation humoristique est notoire. De très nombreux swipes de couvertures sont en réalité des hommages, mais on utilise parfois le terme dénué de toute appréciation d’estime et le swipe peut alors être considéré comme une appropriation sans scrupule, un pillage en somme.
Il n’est pas toujours aisé de distinguer si un swipe est manifestement un hommage ou s’il s’agit seulement d’une copie opportuniste réalisée par manque d’inspiration ou d’originalité (lire à ce sujet l’article de Daniel Best A Rose By Any Other Name, à propos de la célèbre couverture du numéro 1 de Fantastic Four réalisée en 1961 par Jack Kirby et plusieurs fois copiée par John Byrne).
Dans la suite de cet article, nous n’examinerons pas les question éthiques ou les intentions véritables des artistes « copieurs ». Seules les similarités graphiques formelles et les ressemblances entre les dessins retiendront notre attention. Pour désigner un swipe, c’est à dire une copie manifeste d’un dessin, nous utiliserons l’expression imitation graphique ou plus simplement imitation. Lorsque les similarités graphiques sont moins évidentes, nous utiliserons le terme de ressemblance. Ce choix terminologique sera précisé par la suite.
Une couverture de comic book peut faire l’objet de quelques imitations, trois ou quatre habituellement, une dizaine tout au plus dans de rares cas (voir par exemple mon article Esquisse d’une histoire illustrée du mauvais goût).
Devenue illustre dans le domaine des comics, AC1 a donné lieu à beaucoup plus d’appropriations et d’imitations. Le relevé que nous avons réalisé identifie en effet plus de 170 couvertures ou dessins que l’on peut considérer en relation avec le dessin original de Shuster. L’analyse qui suit repose essentiellement sur la collecte de ces illustrations que l’on pourra consulter dans cet album Flickr (en raison des restrictions imposées par la plate-forme vous devez posséder un compte Flickr pour y accéder).
AC1 et ses multiples réinterprétations graphiques constituent donc un cas exceptionnel dans l’histoire des comics. L’analyse de cette abondante production montre que le phénomène est plus complexe qu’il ne paraît au premier abord lorsque l’on se contente d’examiner rapidement des cas plus habituels ayant suscités peu d’imitations. De nombreux rapprochements sont évidents car les similarités graphiques entre le dessin original et la copie sont suffisamment manifestes. Parfois, cependant, les ressemblances sont beaucoup moins claires et il n’est pas toujours possible d’affirmer avec certitude que la copie s’inspire de l’original.
Pour tenter d’organiser la collection relevée, examinons tout d’abord la très longue série des parutions du magazine Action Comics. Elle contient quelques couvertures qui sont manifestement des imitations.
Action Comics #685, Art by Jackson Guice, January 1993 / Superman - The Action Comics Archives - Volume 1, [december] 1997 / Action Comics #800, Art by Drew Struzan, April 2003 / Action Comics #900, Art by Alex Ross (il existe trois variantes de couvertures), June 2011 / Action Comics #10 (2011 Series), August 2012 / Action Comics #27 (2011 Series), March 2014
Action Comics #685, Art by Jackson Guice, January 1993 / Superman – The Action Comics Archives – Volume 1, [december] 1997 / Action Comics #800, Art by Drew Struzan, April 2003 / Action Comics #900, Art by Alex Ross (il existe trois variantes de couvertures), June 2011 / Action Comics #10 (2011 Series), August 2012 / Action Comics #27 (2011 Series), March 2014
Ces dessins peuvent être qualifiés d’imitations sans hésitation car ils comportent plusieurs des quatre motifs formels relevés au début de l’article: posture spécifique de Superman / figuration de sa force colossale / objet lourd et encombrant soulevé et projeté par le héros / personnages effrayés en avant-plan et en arrière-plan. La dernière image qui date de l’année dernière est visiblement un clin d’œil aux parodies publiées principalement sur Internet et qui abondent depuis les années 2000 (nous y reviendrons).
Il est remarquable que ces dessins soient tous relativement récents. Le magazine Action Comics n’aurait-il publié entre 1938 et 1993 aucune imitation de la fameuse couverture de son premier numéro ?
De fait, les imitations incontestables sont absentes durant cette période dans la collection Action Comics et l’on doit alors devenir plus « laxiste » et ne plus rechercher de correspondances formelles rigoureuses entre les dessins. Lorsque l’on étend l’investigation à des ressemblances qui ne sont plus des similarités de composition graphique aussi manifestes, plusieurs autres couvertures peuvent alors êtres repérées.
Action Comics #30, November 1940 / Action Comics #33, February 1941 / Action Comics #257, October 1959 / Action Comics #414, July 1972 / Action Comics #484, June 1978 / Action Comics #31 (2011 Series), July 2014
Action Comics #30, November 1940 / Action Comics #33, February 1941 / Action Comics #257, October 1959 / Action Comics #414, July 1972 / Action Comics #484, June 1978 / Action Comics #31 (2011 Series), July 2014
Ces dessins ne comportent stricto sensu qu’un seul des motifs formels relevés précédemment: la figuration de la force colossale du héros (caractéristique que l’on peut considérer comme « minimale » pour un véritable super-héros). La seconde image, datée de février 1941, pourrait à la limite être retenue en tant qu’imitation car la posture de Superman correspond assez bien (mais le contexte est tout de même fort différent, la voiture est inclinée autrement et n’est pas projetée contre un obstacle, etc.). Tout au plus peut-on affirmer que ces dessins possèdent indéniablement un « air de famille » avec la couverture du numéro 1.
La dernière image (2014) atteste que ces « presque-imitations » sont aussi, très rarement, des créations récentes.
Si les critères de ressemblance entre les dessins deviennent encore un peu plus lâches, d’autres couvertures peuvent être sélectionnées.
Action Comics #17, October 1939 / Action Comics #22, March 1940 / Action Comics #40, September 1941 / Action Comics #650, Art by George Pérez, February 1990
Action Comics #17, October 1939 / Action Comics #22, March 1940 / Action Comics #40, September 1941 / Action Comics #650, Art by George Pérez, February 1990
Il existe toujours un « air de famille » , plus éloigné sans doute, entre ces images et AC1. Même si ce ne sont plus du tout des imitations au sens habituel, ces couvertures n’ont probablement pas été conçues sans une référence implicite à AC1. Remarquons aussi que sur deux de ces images publiées durant la Seconde Guerre mondiale la voiture est remplacée par un char; nous en rencontrerons d’autres.
Devant le succès du personnage, l’éditeur lance en juin 1939 un nouveau titre sous le nom même de Superman. En janvier 1945, la « famille » s’agrandit avec le personnage de Superboy qui relate à l’origine les aventures du jeune Superman publiées dans divers titres (More Fun Comics, Adventure Comics, Superboy). Enfin, Supergirl apparaît en 1959.
Les différents titres de magazines dans lesquels ces super-héros évoluent proposent eux aussi des couvertures inspirées d’AC1, et parfois même de véritables citations illustrées, comme sur les images suivantes.
Superman, version française, circa 1942 / Superboy #12, January-February 1951 / Superman #97, May 1955
Superman, version française, circa 1942 / Superboy #12, January-February 1951 / Superman #97, May 1955
Comme pour le magazine Action Comics lui-même, on retrouve plusieurs imitations flagrantes en couverture de ces autres titres. Elles sont toutes relativement récentes et là encore on retrouve parfois des chars à la place de la voiture projetée.
Secret Origins #1, April 1986 / The Adventures of Superman #427, April 1987 / Superboy #24, 1994 Series, February 1996 / Superman Vol 2 #124, Art by Ron Frenz, June 1997 / Superboy - Risk Double-Shot #1, Art by Joe Phillips & Jasen Rodriguez, February 1998 / Superman 2999 #136, July 1998 / The Adventures of Superman #590, May 2001 / The Adventures of Superman #610, January 2003 / Superman #201, March 2004 / The Adventures of Superman #654, August 2006 / Supergirl #25, 2005 Series, March 2008 / Superman #19, Snappy Answers to Stupid Questions, Al Jaffee, June 2013
Secret Origins #1, April 1986 / The Adventures of Superman #427, April 1987 / Superboy #24, 1994 Series, February 1996 / Superman Vol 2 #124, Art by Ron Frenz, June 1997 / Superboy – Risk Double-Shot #1, Art by Joe Phillips & Jasen Rodriguez, February 1998 / Superman 2999 #136, July 1998 / The Adventures of Superman #590, May 2001 / The Adventures of Superman #610, January 2003 / Superman #201, March 2004 / The Adventures of Superman #654, August 2006 / Supergirl #25, 2005 Series, March 2008 / Superman #19, Snappy Answers to Stupid Questions, Al Jaffee, June 2013
L’un des rares dessins plus ancien qui puisse être considéré comme une imitation est extrait d’une histoire écrite par Jerry Siegel lui-même.
Tales of the Bizarro World, Script by Jerry Siegel, Art by John Forte, Adventure Comics #291, December 1961
Tales of the Bizarro World, Script by Jerry Siegel, Art by John Forte, Adventure Comics #291, December 1961
Bien que la ressemblance soit moins manifeste que dans les exemples plus récents et que la force de Superman ne se manifeste pas ici, la position de la voiture de gauche et le personnage au premier plan qui se tient la tête ne laissent guère de doutes sur la référence directe au dessin original de Shuster.
De même que précédemment pour la collection Action Comics, des dessins de couvertures ressemblants mais qui ne peuvent être qualifiés d’imitations existent aussi pour ces titres.
Superman #19, November-December 1942 / Adventure Comics #138, March 1949 / Superboy #25, April-May 1953 / Supergirl #10, 1996 Series, June 1997 / Supergirl #21, 2005 Series, November 2007 / The Adventures of Superboy, 2010 Series, June 2010
Superman #19, November-December 1942 / Adventure Comics #138, March 1949 / Superboy #25, April-May 1953 / Supergirl #10, 1996 Series, June 1997 / Supergirl #21, 2005 Series, November 2007 / The Adventures of Superboy, 2010 Series, June 2010
De la même manière, les critères de ressemblances peuvent également être plus relâchés, ce qui permet de sélectionner d’autres dessins d’apparence plus éloignée mais qui demeurent néanmoins voisins et possèdent toujours un « air de famille« .
Adventure Comics #103, April 1946 / Adventure Comics #192, September 1953 / Superboy #126, January 1966 / Superman #182, January 1966 / The Adventures of Superman #449, December 1988
Adventure Comics #103, April 1946 / Adventure Comics #192, September 1953 / Superboy #126, January 1966 / Superman #182, January 1966 / The Adventures of Superman #449, December 1988
La scène figure également dans les films dont Superman est le héros.
Superman, Richard Donner, 1978 / Superman Returns, Bryan Singer, 2006
Superman, Richard Donner, 1978 / Superman Returns, Bryan Singer, 2006
Si le film de 2006 représente un Superman adulte dans une scène qui peut être considérée comme une imitation, celui de 1978 donne à voir un Superman enfant exerçant sa force devant ses parents adoptifs stupéfaits, et la scène, cette-fois, ne peut être considérée comme une imitation bien qu’elle demeure ressemblante.
Toutes ces illustrations confirment le constat précédent à propos de la collection Action Comics: les véritables imitations sont pratiquement toutes récentes.
Au long de ces exemples puisés dans un corpus limité aux publications où évoluent Superman et ses proches, nous avons distingué soigneusement entre les imitations – c’est-à-dire les images qui possèdent plusieurs des quatre motifs graphiques formels décrits au début de l’article – et les images qualifiées de ressemblantes qui n’en possèdent qu’un seul, la figuration de la force colossale. Revenons sur cette notion de ressemblance.
Ressemblance de famille et analyse des comics
Il est clair que la figuration de la force colossale ne suffit pas à rapprocher un dessin quelconque représentant Superman de celui de 1938. Sinon, les milliers de couvertures des publications mentionnées ci-dessus devraient pratiquement toutes être retenues… Entre les dessins ainsi réunis, il doit exister des caractéristiques communes qui permettent de considérer qu’ils possèdent une ressemblance, un « air de famille » comme évoqué précédemment.
Le concept de « ressemblance de famille » (Familienähnlichkeit, parfois traduit par « air de famille » ) a été introduit en philosophie par Ludwig Wittgenstein dans les Investigations philosophiques publiées à titre posthume en 1953. Il l’utilise dans sa critique de l’idée selon laquelle un nom fait référence à une énumération d’objets ou un concept à une totalité d’instances (telles les définitions du nombre chez Frege et Russell par exemple). Il soutient que les choses qui semblent pouvoir être conçues comme liées par une caractéristique commune unique doivent plutôt être reliées par une série de similitudes qui se chevauchent, et donc qu’elles ne possèdent en fait aucune caractéristique commune unique.
En développant sa philosophie du langage et pour clarifier cette idée, Wittgenstein compare les langues à des jeux. Si l’on essaie de définir ce qui constitue l' « essence » des jeux, autrement dit une caractéristique commune à tous les jeux, on échoue. Il n’existe pas de dénominateur commun à tous les jeux. Par exemple, dans un jeu s’agit-il de gagner ou de perdre ? Pas toujours. Un jeu est-il toujours une compétition ? Non, puisqu’il existe des jeux solitaires. Il existe tellement de jeux qu’il est impossible de proposer une caractéristique universelle qui les englobe tous. Au lieu de cela, Wittgenstein observe que certains jeux ressemblent à d’autres à certains égards et c’est tout. De nombreux jeux possèdent des caractéristiques communes qui ne sont pas partagées par d’autres, tandis que d’autres jeux partagent de nouvelles caractéristiques spécifiques, et ainsi de suite. Il appelle ces ensembles de caractéristiques variées et non universelles une ressemblance de famille en les assimilant aux ressemblances qui existent entre les membres d’une même famille; la taille, les traits du visage, la couleur des yeux, la démarche, le tempérament, peuvent être partagés par certains membres d’une même famille mais pas par tous. La ressemblance de famille est pour Wittgenstein une sorte de « réseau complexe d’analogies qui s’entrecroisent et s’enveloppent les unes les autres. Analogies d’ensemble comme de détail. » (Investigations philosophiques, 66).
Les Investigations philosophiques ont eu une influence considérable sur le développement de la philosophie analytique au vingtième siècle et le concept de ressemblance de famille a donné lieu a une abondante littérature spécialisée en philosophie et dans les sciences cognitives, notamment dans les approches théoriques de la taxonomie. En 1956, Morris Weitz a inauguré son utilisation dans le domaine de l’art dans un article devenu lui-même extrêmement discuté4. Pour Weitz « L’art ne possède pas d’ensemble de propriétés nécessaires et suffisantes (p. 27). […] Le problème de la nature de l’art est semblable à celui de la nature des jeux […]. Si l’on observe ce que l’on appelle l' « art », nous ne trouverons pas de propriétés communes mais seulement des faisceaux de similarités […] je peux énumérer quelques cas et quelques conditions pour lesquelles je peux appliquer correctement le concept d’art, mais je ne peux les énumérer tous, pour la raison majeure que des conditions nouvelles apparaissent toujours ou sont toujours envisageables (p. 30). ». Il en conclu (grosso modo) que l’art ne peut être défini avec rigueur et demeure un concept ouvert.
L’article séminal de Weitz s’appuie essentiellement sur l’exemple des production littéraires. Par la suite, d’autres auteurs ont utilisé le concept de ressemblance de famille dans le domaine des arts visuels. Peu d’entre eux cependant ont abandonné l’idée ambitieuse d’envisager sous cet angle la globalité du champ des arts visuels. Parmi les rares analystes qui ont utilisé le concept plus sobrement, Dennis Knepp a étudié un sujet précis qui peut sembler incongru aux philosophes de l’art et qui nous intéresse plus particulièrement ici: la pérennité de la figure de Superman dans les comics5.
Le personnage de Superman semble à première vue toujours posséder les mêmes caractéristiques parfaitement reconnaissables: les cheveux noirs et l’accroche-cœur, les yeux bleus, le justaucorps bleu, la ceinture jaune, la cape, le slip et les bottes rouges, et enfin, sur son torse, le dessin d’un ‘S‘ rouge sur un écusson jaune. Knepp remarque cependant qu’en sept décennies le personnage a donné lieu à un nombre incalculable de représentations très variées, et en réalité, les caractéristiques ci-dessus, qui semblent inaltérables, ne sont pas constantes dans le temps et ne peuvent être considérées comme définissant une certaine « essence » de Superman. En 1963, par exemple, notre héros s’est scindé en deux personnages d’aspects bien distincts, Superman-Red/Superman-Blue. Plus fort encore, dans la série The Death of Superman publiée à partir de 1992, il survit sous la forme de quatre super-héros différents (Superboy, Steel, The Eradicator, The Cyborg Superman) qui partagent certains de ses attributs et pouvoirs mais pas tous. Plus récemment, dans la série The New 52, Superman a un look très différent. Par ailleurs, l’écusson emblématique représentant un ‘S‘ ne peut être considéré comme l’apanage de Superman puisqu’il est aussi arboré par Superboy et Supergirl, et même par Krypto le superchien; de plus, dans la série Superman Red Son qui date de 2003, il est remplacé par un tout autre insigne formé sur la faucille et le marteau communistes.
Selon Knepp, la permanence de la figure de Superman à travers ces multiples variations stylistiques et narratives s’explique par la ressemblance de famille qui se manifeste dans toutes les variantes du héros. Il n’existe pas une « essence » de Superman mais seulement des caractéristiques visuelles variées qui se croisent et se chevauchent dans les différentes versions. Un exemple remarquable vient à l’appui de cette thèse « par l’absurde » pourrait-on dire: la version dite Electric Blue Superman apparue en 1998 comme une réécriture du Superman-Red/Superman-Blue de 1963. Dans cette incarnation, seul le logo ‘S‘ sur la poitrine du héros subsiste et il apparaît plus grand et stylisé. Toutes les autres caractéristiques sont modifiées et le super-héros historique n’est plus guère reconnaissable. Visuellement, Electric Blue Superman n’a quasiment plus rien en commun avec Superman à tel point que des fans se sont rebellés et ont écrit à l’éditeur qu’il ne peut pas être Superman. La ressemblance de famille ne fonctionne plus dans ce cas et le personnage est par le fait exclu de la famille des représentations éclectiques de Superman.
Après ces quelques rappels, il doit apparaître clairement que la ressemblance mentionnée ci-dessus à propos des dessins qui évoquent AC1 sans en être une imitation constitue précisément une ressemblance de famille appliquée non plus à un unique personnage mais à une scène. Un dessin qui possède une ressemblance de famille avec AC1 représente une scène possédant un faisceau d’analogies et de similarités avec celle-ci. Lorsque les deux dessins partagent certaines caractéristiques formelles, c’est-à-dire un ou plusieurs des quatre motifs visuels décrits au début de l’article, la ressemblance de famille est extrêmement forte et devient imitation. Pour illustrer prosaïquement cette distinction, un dessin où la voiture projetée est grosso modo dans la même position inclinée que sur AC1 est une imitation, mais lorsque la voiture n’est plus du tout lancée de la même façon et qu’il n’existe pas d’autres correspondances graphiques flagrantes avec AC1, c’est une ressemblance de famille. Autrement dit, le concept de ressemblance de famille appliqué aux scènes de comics englobe celui d’imitation, ou si l’on préfère une imitation (ou un swipe) peut-être considéré comme une ressemblance de famille très forte où les analogies et similarités deviennent visuellement manifestes et formellement reconnaissables.
Par la suite, nous appellerons AC1-ressemblance un dessin qui possède une ressemblance de famille avec AC1 sans être une imitation, et AC1-imitation une AC1-ressemblance plus spécifique qui possède plusieurs des quatre motifs graphiques formels décrits au début de l’article.
Dans cette proposition terminologique, le préfixe AC1- qualifie une ressemblance d’un type particulier. Toutes les ressemblances ainsi désignées – et a fortiori bien sûr les imitations – se réfèrent à un prototype, en l’occurrence la couverture d’AC1. Lorsque l’on met en évidence une ressemblance de cette catégorie, il s’agit d’établir un lien entre une image et un modèle bien précis qui lui est antérieur, un prototype. Toutes les AC1-ressemblances sont évidemment apparues après la publication du prototype (AC1 dans notre cas) et sont donc des ressemblances avec un prototype.
Mais il existe aussi des ressemblances sans prototype qui, en règle générale, ne peuvent pas être qualifiées de ressemblances de famille. À la fin de cet article, nous examinerons quelques exemples de dessins antérieurs à AC1 dont certains éléments figuratifs rappellent l’un ou l’autre des motifs graphiques de AC1. À une possible exception près, il s’agit bien de ressemblances mais pas de ressemblances de famille avérées, sinon cela signifierait que les auteurs d’AC1 se seraient inspirés de ces dessins publiés avant 1938. Or de telles influences supposées ne peuvent pratiquement jamais être démontrées. On ne sait pas d’ordinaire si une ressemblance sans prototype est une ressemblance de famille, car l’affinité entre les dessins peut parfaitement être fortuite (que l’on songe au sosies pour revenir à l’analogie wittgensteinienne). Par contre, lorsque ces ressemblances sans prototype sont nombreuses et concernent des images publiées dans un même contexte et dans une période relativement restreinte, il est possible de soupçonner des influences. En somme, l’objectif principal du présent article consiste à montrer qu’après 1938, nous avons affaire à des ressemblances de famille dont certaines sont des imitations, tandis qu’avant 1938, il existe tout un ensemble de ressemblances sans prototype relatives à des publications bien précises (les pulp magazines des années 1920-1930) dont la conjugaison peut sembler leur conférer le caractère de ressemblances de famille alors qu’elles n’en sont pas.
Agrandissement de la famille
On le sait, toute une pléiade de héros aux super-pouvoirs sont apparus dans le sillage de Superman. Plusieurs d’entre eux sont entrés dans la prolifique famille des super-héros en figurant sur des dessins qui constituaient manifestement des références fracassantes à AC1, captant au passage la renommée du célèbre dessin et de son héros. La ressemblance de famille se poursuit alors par extension à ces nouveaux venus.
Captain Marvel fait ainsi son apparition dès 1940 en surpassant Superman sur une couverture que l’on peut considérer comme un véritable clin d’œil parodique à AC1.
 Whiz Comics #2, Captain Marvel, Cover art by C. C. Beck, February 1940
Whiz Comics #2, Captain Marvel, Cover art by C. C. Beck, February 1940
Dans le numéro suivant, sa position et les soldats allemands effrayés en avant-plan rappellent également AC1.
Whiz Comics #3, Captain Marvel, March 1940
Whiz Comics #3, Captain Marvel, March 1940
On peut encore retenir pour ce personnage cette couverture plus tardive.
Captain Marvel Comics #v3#10, Anglo-American Publishing Company Limited (Canada), October 1944
Captain Marvel Comics #v3#10, Anglo-American Publishing Company Limited (Canada), October 1944
Dans les années 1940 et 1950, les éditeurs ont plusieurs fois utilisé ce procédé de la ressemblance de famille lorsqu’un nouveau super-héros faisait ses premiers pas, souvent dans un nouveau titre.
Speed Comics #6, Shock Gibson, The Human Dynamo, March 1940
Speed Comics #6, Shock Gibson, The Human Dynamo, March 1940
Dr. Strange, également en 1940
Thrilling Comics #v2#1 (4), Dr. Strange, May 1940
Thrilling Comics #v2#1 (4), Dr. Strange, May 1940
Amazing-Man (version Centaur Publications) en 1941.
Amazing-Man Comics #19, January 1941
Amazing-Man Comics #19, January 1941
Joe Hercules, en 1941
Hit Comics #10, Joe Hercules, April 1941
Hit Comics #10, Joe Hercules, April 1941
Plastic Man, en 1951.
Plastic Man #30, July 1951
Plastic Man #30, July 1951
Parmi ces super-héros virils un peu oubliés maintenant, Wonder Woman fait une apparition remarquée en décembre 1941. Imaginée par le couple de psychologues William Moulton Marston et Elizabeth Holloway Marston, Wonder Woman s’affirme immédiatement comme un personnage féministe et devient la principale figure de Sensation Comics à partir de janvier 1942. Deux années plus tard, elle est représentée sur des couvertures AC1-ressemblantes.
Sensation Comics #26, February 1944 / Sensation Comics #28, April 1944
Sensation Comics #26, February 1944 / Sensation Comics #28, April 1944
Mais on doit à nouveau attendre deux ans pour que Wonder Woman apparaisse sur une authentique AC1-imitation.
Sensation Comics #51, Cover art by Harry G. Peter, March 1946
Sensation Comics #51, Cover art by Harry G. Peter, March 1946
À la différence d’AC1, ce dessin de comporte pas de personnages en avant-plan, la scène se passe sur un littoral, la voiture n’est pas projetée sur un rocher, et ses occupants sont encore agrippés à l’intérieur ou à l’extérieur du véhicule. On remarquera aussi les proportions exagérées de Wonder Woman. Néanmoins, par la position caractéristique de l’héroïne et celle de l’automobile malmenée, cette couverture constitue la première AC1-imitation publiée en dehors de la famille d’origine de Superman.
Ce dessin a fait lui-même l’objet d’un swipe en 2011 sur le site Deviant Art.
Sensation Comics #51, cover remake by deffectx on Deviant Art, 2011
Sensation Comics #51, cover remake by deffectx on Deviant Art, 2011
Qu’en est-il des autres héros très connus comme Spider-Man ou Batman ?
Rappelons tout d’abord que Batman n’est pas à proprement parler un super-héros puisqu’il ne possède aucun super-pouvoirs. Néanmoins, les scénaristes se sont ingéniés à le représenter dans les années 1950 sur des dessins AC1-ressemblants.
Detective Comics #250, December 1957 / Detective Comics #268, June 1959
Detective Comics #250, December 1957 / Detective Comics #268, June 1959
C’est seulement tout récemment que Batman et Robin figurent sur une AC1-imitation et sont capables d’accomplir ce que Superman faisait facilement il y a fort longtemps.
Batman and Robin #39, Art by Mick Gray and Patrick Gleason, to be published April 2015
Batman and Robin #39, Art by Mick Gray and Patrick Gleason, to be published April 2015
Spider-Man quant à lui est représenté sur une AC1-ressemblance dans les années 1960.
The Amazing Spider-Man #32, January 1966
The Amazing Spider-Man #32, January 1966
Et sur une AC1-imitation à la fin des années 1980.
The Amazing Spider-Man #306, Cover art by Todd McFarlane, Early October 1988
The Amazing Spider-Man #306, Cover art by Todd McFarlane, Early October 1988
Il figure également sur un exemple de la même époque en compagnie d’un « super-villain », The Abomination (créé en 1967).
The Amazing Spider-Man Annual #23, 1989 [The Abomination]
The Amazing Spider-Man Annual #23, 1989 [The Abomination]
Ces deux héros emblématiques illustrent une nouvelle fois le phénomène que nous observions à propos de Superman et de sa famille proche: les AC1-imitations sont presque toutes bien plus récentes que les AC1-ressemblances.
Dû à Jack Kirby, le dessin suivant constitue une exception puisqu’il représente en 1962 le super-héros nouvellement créé The Thing dans une case d’introduction qui est une évidente AC1-imitation.
Fantastic Four #4, Chapter 2 - Enter the Sub-Mariner, by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, May 1962
Fantastic Four #4, Chapter 2 – Enter the Sub-Mariner, by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, May 1962
Cette même année 1962 est publiée la première couverture de bande dessinée non américaine que l’on peut considérer comme une AC1-ressemblance.
Benoît Brisefer - Les Taxis rouges, par Peyo, 1962
Benoît Brisefer – Les Taxis rouges, par Peyo, 1962
Cette scène est reproduite sur l’affiche du film de Manuel Pradal, Benoît Brisefer : les Taxis rouges, sorti en décembre 2014.
Une dérivation: les chars
Nous avons déjà rencontré à plusieurs reprises la figuration d’un char en lieu et place de l’automobile esquintée par Superman. Apparu avec la Seconde Guerre mondiale, ce motif particulier a donné lieu par la suite à un véritable sous-ensemble autonome dérivé de la couverture d’AC1 originale, une sorte de « fork » en somme. Les chars de combat violemment projetés qui figurent sur ces dessins sont aussi bien des AC1-ressemblances que des AC1-imitations.
Les chars – ressemblances
Action Comics #17, October 1939 / Speed Comics #1, October 1939 / Smash Comics #14, September 1940 / Amazing Stories v14n12, #157, December 1940 / Whiz Comics #17, May 1941 / Fantastic Comics #19, June 1941 / Action Comics #40, September 1941 / Thrilling Comics #23, December 1941
Action Comics #17, October 1939 / Speed Comics #1, October 1939 / Smash Comics #14, September 1940 / Amazing Stories v14n12, #157, December 1940 / Whiz Comics #17, May 1941 / Fantastic Comics #19, June 1941 / Action Comics #40, September 1941 / Thrilling Comics #23, December 1941
Au passage, on observe qu’Amazing Stories n’est pas un comic book mais un pulp magazine célèbre. Il s’agit de la seule couverture de pulp qui figure dans notre relevé. Il apparaît en effet que les choix graphiques effectués par ces magazines essentiellement tournés vers les textes ont été assez peu influencés par les comics. L’inverse n’est vraisemblablement pas exact comme nous le verrons par la suite.
L’image la plus exotique du genre est sans conteste la suivante, extraite d’une bande dessinée chinoise publiée à Hong Kong qui relate les aventures d’Electric Pig, un cochon doté de super-pouvoirs qui pourchasse les criminels grâce à sa résistance aux lasers et aux projectiles6.
Electric Pig, Tsui Yu-on, Hong Kong comics, 1976
Electric Pig, Tsui Yu-on, Hong Kong comics, 1976
Les chars – imitations
The Adventures of Superman #427, April 1987 / The Adventures of Superman #590, May 2001 / The Golem, Eli Eshed & Uri Fink, circa 2003./ Über #3, Homage Cover, June 2013
The Adventures of Superman #427, April 1987 / The Adventures of Superman #590, May 2001 / The Golem, Eli Eshed & Uri Fink, circa 2003./ Über #3, Homage Cover, June 2013
La troisième image provient d’une bande dessiné israélienne.
À nouveau le même constat s’impose pour ce sous-ensemble spécifique: les premières images publiées dès la fin des années 1930 jusqu’aux années 1970 sont des ressemblances et les véritables imitations sont plus récentes.
Imitations récentes (1985-2015)
Les AC1-imitations deviennent très nombreuses et quasiment exclusives à partir de la fin des années 1980. Assez curieusement en effet, les AC1-ressemblances qui étaient largement majoritaires jusqu’aux années 1980 disparaissent totalement durant ces trente dernières années. Les swipes d’AC1 au sens habituel du mot sont donc un phénomène dont l’ampleur est récente même s’il en existe quelques exemples sporadiques dès la fin des années 1940. L’abondance actuelle des swipes s’explique en grande partie parce que les créations graphiques se sont multipliées sur Internet.
En raison du grand nombre de dessins collectés pour cette période, seul un nombre retreint d’entre eux seront présentés ici (le lecteur pourra consulter d’autres exemples sur l’album Flickr déjà mentionné).
Super-héros
Fantastic Four #291 [Newsstand Edition], Cover art by John Byrne, June 1986 / Elseworld Superman War of the Worlds, Michael Lark, 1999 / Justice Society of America #8 [Incentive Cover Edition], October 2007 / Zoom Suit #3, 2006 / Infinite Crisis # 5, March 2006, page 14 / Godstorm #1, April 2014 / Magnus Robot Fighter 7, Acclaim, circa 1997 / Superman Birthright #2, October 2003 / The New World, by Peter Snejbjerg, The Mighty #1, April 2009
Fantastic Four #291 [Newsstand Edition], Cover art by John Byrne, June 1986 / Elseworld Superman War of the Worlds, Michael Lark, 1999 / Justice Society of America #8 [Incentive Cover Edition], October 2007 / Zoom Suit #3, 2006 / Infinite Crisis # 5, March 2006, page 14 / Godstorm #1, April 2014 / Magnus Robot Fighter 7, Acclaim, circa 1997 / Superman Birthright #2, October 2003 / The New World, by Peter Snejbjerg, The Mighty #1, April 2009
Certaines compositions intérieures aux albums sont plus riches.
Final Crisis - Legion of 3 Worlds, Book One, George Pérez, October 2009
Final Crisis – Legion of 3 Worlds, Book One, George Pérez, October 2009
The Atomic Legion, by Mike Richardson (Author) and Bruce Zick (Illustrator), Dark Horse, April 2014
The Atomic Legion, by Mike Richardson (Author) and Bruce Zick (Illustrator), Dark Horse, April 2014
Parodies
Dans ces publications, le personnage de Superman est caricaturé en « gros musclé bêta », parfois moqué ou même ridiculisé, ou bien encore il apparaît dans des tenues excentriques. Il demeure cependant reconnaissable sur toutes ces parodies.
Superman - Tales of the Bizarro World, Art by Jaime Hernandez, [September] 2000 / Slumberland [référence à Madman de Mike Allred], circa 2008 / Action Clumsy #1 [April 27], Deviant Art, circa 2012 / Superman Family Adventures #5, November 2012 / ActionAble Comics #1 [June 1938], Illustration by Steve Murray, circa 2013 / Spawn Comics #228, February 2013 / A**hole Comics #1 [June 1938], Derek Langillle, circa 2014 / Axis - Hobgoblin #1, December 2014 / AC #1 remake by isikol from Deviant Art, 2014
Superman – Tales of the Bizarro World, Art by Jaime Hernandez, [September] 2000 / Slumberland [référence à Madman de Mike Allred], circa 2008 / Action Clumsy #1 [April 27], Deviant Art, circa 2012 / Superman Family Adventures #5, November 2012 / ActionAble Comics #1 [June 1938], Illustration by Steve Murray, circa 2013 / Spawn Comics #228, February 2013 / A**hole Comics #1 [June 1938], Derek Langillle, circa 2014 / Axis – Hobgoblin #1, December 2014 / AC #1 remake by isikol from Deviant Art, 2014
Autres héros
D’autres héros plus improbables figurent aussi sur des AC1-imitations.
Fallen Angel #15, April 2007 / Buffy the Vampire Slayer (Season Eight, 2007–2011), Twilight Part 1, Dark Horse Comics, March 2010 / Popeye #1, IDW 2012 Series, Art by Bruce Ozella, April 2012
Fallen Angel #15, April 2007 / Buffy the Vampire Slayer (Season Eight, 2007–2011), Twilight Part 1, Dark Horse Comics, March 2010 / Popeye #1, IDW 2012 Series, Art by Bruce Ozella, April 2012
On remarquera la puissance colossale de Buffy capable de projeter une locomotive comme un simple morceau de bois.
Les héros Disney participent également à la profusion d’imitations.
Disney's Hero Squad #1, January 2010 / Swipe, Donald by Don Rosa, August 2012
Disney’s Hero Squad #1, January 2010 / Swipe, Donald by Don Rosa, August 2012
Affiches
Des graphistes imaginatifs ont aussi exploité la scène fameuse dans leurs créations.
Funny Books movie poster by Rita Moore, 2009 / Patricia Lecy-Davis VS. Robert Thoms for Tacoma City Council, 2012 / Blood And Bones, September 2012 (affiche pour une compétition)
Funny Books movie poster by Rita Moore, 2009 / Patricia Lecy-Davis VS. Robert Thoms for Tacoma City Council, 2012 / Blood And Bones, September 2012 (affiche pour une compétition)
Pastiches (sélection)
Les pastiches qui abondent sur Internet sont des imitations le plus souvent humoristiques. Ce sont des plaisanteries de graphistes qui demeurent apparemment respectueux envers l’archétype du super-héros et chacune de ces images peut être considérée comme une forme d’hommage à AC1. La plupart d’entre elles s’inspirent rigoureusement de la scène d’origine, avec la voiture inclinée et projetée.
Wacky Squirrel #4, Art by Jim Bradrick, October 1988 / Jupiter #7, Sandberg Publishing, February 2000 / The Breaking Bane #1, by Marco D’Alfonso on Deviant Art, 2012 / Toxic Shock Comics #1, September 2006 / Rat-Man Collection #59, Catastrofe, by Leo Ortolani's, 2007 / Zombie Comics, by Billy Tackett, circa 2008 / Axalon Comics photo tribute, by Gizmo Tracer, 2009 / Centoloman #0, 2009 / Homage by Gustavo Deveze, 2009
Wacky Squirrel #4, Art by Jim Bradrick, October 1988 / Jupiter #7, Sandberg Publishing, February 2000 / The Breaking Bane #1, by Marco D’Alfonso on Deviant Art, 2012 / Toxic Shock Comics #1, September 2006 / Rat-Man Collection #59, Catastrofe, by Leo Ortolani’s, 2007 / Zombie Comics, by Billy Tackett, circa 2008 / Axalon Comics photo tribute, by Gizmo Tracer, 2009 / Centoloman #0, 2009 / Homage by Gustavo Deveze, 2009
Chorizo Comics #1, July 2009 / Super Meat Boy #1, September 2009 / Somerville Scout #7, Fall 2010 / AC #1, by Keat Teoh, 2011 / Classics and Comics, 2011 / The Dandy #3538, June 11, 2011 / Action Guy Comics, Peter Griffin Parody by ~JakeMackessy on deviantART, circa 2012 / Bender Parody by JakeMackessy on Deviant Art, 2012 / Never Say Die #1, [June 1985], 2012
Chorizo Comics #1, July 2009 / Super Meat Boy #1, September 2009 / Somerville Scout #7, Fall 2010 / AC #1, by Keat Teoh, 2011 / Classics and Comics, 2011 / The Dandy #3538, June 11, 2011 / Action Guy Comics, Peter Griffin Parody by ~JakeMackessy on deviantART, circa 2012 / Bender Parody by JakeMackessy on Deviant Art, 2012 / Never Say Die #1, [June 1985], 2012
Original Parody Fan art, circa 2012 / Culture Shock #1, by Roo, August 2012 / Kevin Keller #5, December 2012 / Art Single, by Mike Dougherty, 2013 / Cover homage by Bracey, featuring his character Mr. Happy, 2013 / Cover homage by Chaz, featuring the characters of Bill Walko's web-comic The Hero Business, 2013 / Cover mash-up of AC #1 and a lamp, modified by Elite Fixtures, 2013 / Super López #1, by Juan López, circa 2013 / Variant cover of Regular Show #1 by Chuck BB (KaBOOM Studios), 2013
Original Parody Fan art, circa 2012 / Culture Shock #1, by Roo, August 2012 / Kevin Keller #5, December 2012 / Art Single, by Mike Dougherty, 2013 / Cover homage by Bracey, featuring his character Mr. Happy, 2013 / Cover homage by Chaz, featuring the characters of Bill Walko’s web-comic The Hero Business, 2013 / Cover mash-up of AC #1 and a lamp, modified by Elite Fixtures, 2013 / Super López #1, by Juan López, circa 2013 / Variant cover of Regular Show #1 by Chuck BB (KaBOOM Studios), 2013
Xoen Comics on Deviant Art, circa 2013 / Ugly Doll Comics, May 2013 / Sock it to Me Comics, by Sean Von Gorman, August 2013 / Scribble Comics #1, September 2013 / AC #1 parody by johnnyism from Deviant Art, 2014 / Math Comics #Pi, by Ka-Woody [November 1915], circa 2014 / Honey Badger #1, January 2014 / Solar - Man of the Atom (AC #1 Cover Swipe Variant), April 2014, [Limited to 500 copies] / The Multiversity #1, October 2014
Xoen Comics on Deviant Art, circa 2013 / Ugly Doll Comics, May 2013 / Sock it to Me Comics, by Sean Von Gorman, August 2013 / Scribble Comics #1, September 2013 / AC #1 parody by johnnyism from Deviant Art, 2014 / Math Comics #Pi, by Ka-Woody [November 1915], circa 2014 / Honey Badger #1, January 2014 / Solar – Man of the Atom (AC #1 Cover Swipe Variant), April 2014, [Limited to 500 copies] / The Multiversity #1, October 2014
Dans cette profusion, on remarque quelques créations insolites comme cette Cavewoman de Budd Root qui assomme un dinosaure avec une voiture.
Cavewoman pin-up, by Budd Root, 2011
Cavewoman pin-up, by Budd Root, 2011
Plus rarement, les vigoureux héros n’utilisent pas une automobile.
A-Ko Comics #1, June 1986 / Nodwick #8, Henchman Publishing - Do Gooder Press, circa 1999 / Dr Blink, Superhero Shrink #0, by John Kovalic and Christopher Jones, 2004 / Fuzzy Bunnies From Hell #1, July 2006 / Delivery-Boy Man #1 by Philip J. Fry of Futurama, 2010 / Threadless t-shirt design of Action Glyphics by Dann Matthews, 2010 / TurboZombie #1 Action Comic Ink, 2010 / Mr Awesome Comics, Dezember 2010
A-Ko Comics #1, June 1986 / Nodwick #8, Henchman Publishing – Do Gooder Press, circa 1999 / Dr Blink, Superhero Shrink #0, by John Kovalic and Christopher Jones, 2004 / Fuzzy Bunnies From Hell #1, July 2006 / Delivery-Boy Man #1 by Philip J. Fry of Futurama, 2010 / Threadless t-shirt design of Action Glyphics by Dann Matthews, 2010 / TurboZombie #1 Action Comic Ink, 2010 / Mr Awesome Comics, Dezember 2010
Slimey the Hero, circa 2012 / Hatman Comics #2 [July 1980], circa 2013 / Mushroom Comics [September 1985], circa 2013 / Comic ConQuest #1, July 2013, AC #1 spoof / Doctor Comics #1, by Vincent Carrozza [November 1963], circa 2014 / Reaction Comics, cracked.com, 2014 / Itty Bitty Bunnies In Rainbow Pixie Candy Land, April 2014, #1B / Doodle Jump #1, June 2014
Slimey the Hero, circa 2012 / Hatman Comics #2 [July 1980], circa 2013 / Mushroom Comics [September 1985], circa 2013 / Comic ConQuest #1, July 2013, AC #1 spoof / Doctor Comics #1, by Vincent Carrozza [November 1963], circa 2014 / Reaction Comics, cracked.com, 2014 / Itty Bitty Bunnies In Rainbow Pixie Candy Land, April 2014, #1B / Doodle Jump #1, June 2014
Parmi la grande variétés d’objets lourds et encombrants projetés, on remarque aussi un ours imposant.
Team Fortress Comics #3, A Cold Day in Hell, Valve Corporation, April 2, 2014
Team Fortress Comics #3, A Cold Day in Hell, Valve Corporation, April 2, 2014
L’enquête visuelle qui précède montre en définitive que l’histoire de la renommée d’AC1 est longue et comporte plusieurs étapes. Dans un premier temps, les auteurs de comics ne copient pas le dessin de la couverture et proposent des images qui font seulement allusion à AC1. Cette première période où les AC1-ressemblances sont nombreuses concerne tous les super-héros, y compris Superman et sa famille proche. Il est probable que les auteurs craignaient qu’on les accuse de manque d’inspiration voire même de plagiat (au moins pour ceux qui n’étaient pas publiés par l’éditeur DC Comics). Cette réserve est rompue exceptionnellement en 1946 par Wonder Woman, membre de l’écurie DC Comics, qui figure pour la première fois sur une incontestable AC1-imitation (Sensation Comics #51, March 1946). Les AC1-ressemblances ont été la règle durant plusieurs décennies et les AC1-imitations des exceptions. Il faut attendre 1961 pour voir une AC1-imitation de Superman lui-même à l’intérieur d’une histoire (Adventure Comics #291, December 1961) et l’année suivante pour un autre super-héros chez le grand concurrent Marvel Comics, toujours dans une histoire (The Thing dans Fantastic Four #4, May 1962). Ce n’est que quarante ans après la brèche ouverte par Wonder Woman qu’une autre AC1-imitation représente à nouveau Superman sur une couverture (Secret Origins #1, April 1986) et Marvel attend encore deux années avant de se lancer dans une AC1-imitation en couverture avec un héros maison (Spider-Man dans The Amazing Spider-Man #306, October 1988). Le déferlement des AC1-imitations s’installe alors progressivement à partir de la fin des années 1980, puis les AC1-ressemblances disparaissent. Si le processus est initié par l’éditeur DC Comics qui prend le parti de publier au compte-gouttes quelques imitations dans un océan de ressemblances, les autres éditeurs suivent toujours ce lent mouvement avec un peu de retard. La progression de la ressemblance vers l’imitation paraît s’être déroulée comme une lente libération des soupçons de plagiat ou de manque d’inspiration pour se transformer graduellement en une succession d’hommages. À la fin des années 1990, l’imagerie des AC1-imitations est totalement installée et les variations ne concernent plus la disposition de la scène qui apparaît figée, mais uniquement les formes et costumes des protagonistes. Puis les parodies et pastiches fusent durant les années 2000 à partir d’une composition graphique désormais immuable.
En bref, l’imagerie pléthorique de Superman s’est cristallisée sur ce dessin très tardivement. Alors que le personnage lui-même est rapidement devenu iconique, l’icône culturelle précise qu’est la couverture d’Action Comics #1 a mis plus de quarante ans à naître. Parmi les raisons qui peuvent expliquer ce phénomène, il est probable que la crainte de l’accusation de plagiat ou de manque d’inspiration constituait un frein puissant à son appropriabilité, condition nécessaire pour rendre possible la multiplication des imitations, et donc la constitution d’une imagerie autonome et cohérente devenue prolifique sur Internet7.
Mythes et super-héros
De nombreux auteurs ont soutenu que les histoires de super-héros constituent des mythes modernes8. Brian J. Robb rapporte ainsi que Stan Lee, le célèbre écrivain et éditeur de Marvel, était très audacieux et ne doutait pas que les super-héros forment « une mythologie du vingtième-siècle en mettant en scène des mythes entièrement contemporains, une famille de légendes qui pourraient être transmises aux futures générations »9. Plus circonspect, Umberto Eco estime que « Superman tient en tant que mythe uniquement si le lecteur perd le contrôle des rapports temporels et renonce à les prendre pour base de raisonnements, s’abandonnant ainsi au flux incontrôlable des histoires qui lui sont racontées en restant dans l’illusion d’un présent continu »10.
Dans une approche différente, d’autres ont estimé que les super-héros peuvent être comparés aux héros de la mythologie antique. Il est vrai que cette filiation est revendiquée dès le début du genre par des personnages de tout premier ordre. À l’image de Captain Marvel, apparu en 1940, dont les pouvoirs sont liés au mot magique Shazam qui dérive de dieux ou héros de l’antiquité (Salomon, Hercule, Atlas, Zeus, Achille, Mercure) et qui sera identifié rapidement à cet acronyme, ou bien encore de Wonder Woman dont les racines plongent dans la mythologie grecque – elle est en effet présentée comme la princesse Diana, issue d’une tribu d’Amazones, et dès son introduction à la fin de 1941, elle est apparentée à plusieurs dieux et héros de l’antiquité dont Aphrodite, Athéna, ou bien encore Hercule.
Archétype de la force, le héros antique Hercule joue assurément un rôle de tout premier plan dans ces similitudes. Ainsi, pour Brian J. Robb à nouveau, les racines de Superman sont à rechercher chez Hercule (op. cit. p. 11). À l’appui de son propos, il cite Jerry Siegel lui-même qui admettait que sa création est « un personnage comme Samson, Hercule, et tous les hommes forts dont j’avais jamais entendu parler, fusionnés en un seul » (ibid.). Lorsque l’on examine les études académiques sur les super-héros, force est de constater que la comparaison entre Hercule et Superman est récurrente, à tel point qu’un symposium important qui s’est tenu sur le sujet il y a une dizaine d’années a publié ses actes avec ce sous-titre explicite: « From Hercules to Superman »11.
De Hercule à Superman, la conjecture de Knowles
En 2007, l’écrivain et auteur de comics Christopher Knowles publie un ouvrage remarqué et controversé qui étudie l’évolution des archétypes mythologiques dans les comics et ambitionne également de mettre à jour de supposées influences occultes ou mystiques chez les auteurs de ces productions12. Il prétend dans son livre révéler l’histoire secrète des héros de comics et s’égare parfois dans des considérations un peu fumeuses sur le spiritisme, la gnose, les rosicruciens, la franc-maçonnerie, etc.
Dans cet ouvrage, Knowles remarque que l’histoire des comics a connu plusieurs super-héros dénommés Hercule qui sont tous directement inspirés du héros de l’Antiquité: Joe Hercules, paru dans Hit Comics de l’éditeur Quality Comics à partir de juillet 1940, la version DC Comics à partir de décembre 1941, et enfin, plus tardive, la version Marvel Comics en 1965.
Peu après la parution de son livre, Knowles s’est à nouveau focalisé sur le personnage d’Hercule et a développé une idée très spéculative selon laquelle, pour ses créateurs, Superman n’agit pas comme Hercule, mais qu’il est assimilable à Hercule. Son propos repose essentiellement sur des considérations graphiques assez aventureuses. Il se réfère ainsi à trois couvertures publiées dans les années 1940.
Action Comics #27, August 1940 / Action Comics #82, March 1945 / Superman #28, May-June 1944
Action Comics #27, August 1940 / Action Comics #82, March 1945 / Superman #28, May-June 1944
Selon Knowles, la première image évoque le premier des douze travaux d’Hercule, lorsqu’il tue le lion de Némée, tandis que la seconde est une allusion à l’épisode où Hercule délivre Prométhée de l’Aigle du Caucase. Dans le troisième enfin, Superman apparaît en compagnie d’Hercule et d’Atlas, comme s’il était leur égal.
À partir de ces interprétations légères et peu convaincantes, Knowles a ensuite proposé un rapprochement entre AC1 et une peinture de Antonio Pollaiuolo datant la Renaissance qui représente Hercule et l’Hydre de Lerne.
Antonio Pollaiuolo, Hercule et l'Hydre, 1470, Musée des Offices, Florence
Antonio Pollaiuolo, Hercule et l’Hydre, 1470, Musée des Offices, Florence
Pour Knowles, les positions respectives d’Hercule et de Superman sur les deux images ainsi que les orientations de leurs corps et des objets qu’ils brandissent (massue/voiture) sont tout à fait semblables et ne peuvent être le fruit d’une coïncidence. Il décrit ensuite une série de points de concordance entre les deux illustrations, il postule par exemple que la cape de Superman n’est rien d’autre que la dépouille du Lion de Némée dont Hercule est revêtu et que le logo S sur sa poitrine est semblable au S formé par le cou de l’Hydre. Puis il dresse des schémas comparatifs entre les angles principaux dans les deux compositions.
Comparaisons entre le tableau de Pollaiuolo et la couverture d'Action Comics #1 selon Christopher Knowles
Comparaisons entre le tableau de Pollaiuolo et la couverture d’Action Comics #1 selon Christopher Knowles
Pour un peu, l’auteur nous proposerait de discerner le nombre d’or dans la composition de l’image…
Sans entrer dans le détail de ces comparaisons, rappelons que le dessin original de Shuster n’est pas celui de la couverture. Sur celui de Shuster, en page 9 de l’histoire, les orientations sont sensiblement différentes et la roue détachée de la voiture n’est pas dans la même position. Au mieux, Knowles prétend que c’est l’artiste inconnu auteur de la couverture d’AC1 qui s’est inspiré d’un tableau de la Renaissance et non les créateurs de Superman.
Plus sérieusement, Knowles ne donne aucun argument probant à l’appui de sa thèse qui demeure une conjecture purement visuelle. On ne sait même pas si Siegel et Shuster connaissaient le tableau du Musée des Offices. Sa théorie peut sembler séduisante, mais elle n’est pas étayée et n’a jamais donné lieu a une discussion critique sérieuse; on ne peut que regretter qu’elle soit parfois présentée comme une hypothèse conséquente (elle est ainsi mentionnée sans aucune argumentation dans l’encyclopédie Wikipedia/en). Si l’on reprend la terminologie exposée plus haut, Knowles effectue un glissement audacieux et injustifié d’une unique ressemblance sans prototype vers une ressemblance de famille.
Cela ne signifie pas pour autant que les ressemblances éventuelles entre AC1 et des images antérieures soient toujours dépourvues de signification, même si l’on ne sait pas précisément si Siegel ou Shuster les connaissaient. C’est ce que nous allons tenter d’établir sur des images qui appartiennent à un univers culturel beaucoup plus proche des comics et ne sont pas isolées, les illustrations des pulp magazines.
Les pulp magazines et les origines de Superman
Tous les historiens de la bande dessinée américaine mentionnent l’influence des pulp magazines sur les premiers comics de fiction et expliquent que certains personnages évoluant dans les pulps des années 1920-1930 sont les ancêtres des super-héros13. Mais le rôle de ces publications dans l’émergence des comic books de fiction est décrite comme limitée, restreinte à l’apparence générale des personnages, à leur comportement, aux récits. Les pulps intéressent ces historiens parce qu’ils mettent en scène des justiciers mystérieux, souvent capés et masqués, parfois dotés de pouvoirs extraordinaires, à l’instar de leurs successeurs super-héros. Le contenu iconographique des pulps ne retient pas leur attention et il n’est que très rarement fait mention de l’influence de ces publications sur les orientations graphiques des comics.
Les premiers auteurs de comics de fiction ont souvent commencé leurs carrières en écrivant des histoires pour les pulp magazines. C’est le cas de Jerome Siegel qui était un grand admirateur de cette littérature. On rapporte souvent que Clark Kent, le nom du journaliste sous lequel se cache Superman, est un hommage de sa part à Doc Savage, dont le nom complet est Clark Savage, Jr., et à The Shadow, dont l’identité véritable est Kent Allard.
Siegel et Shuster étaient des lecteurs « avides des magazines Amazing Stories et Weird Tales » (Robb, op. cit. p. 30). En 1929, Siegel écrit à la rubrique du courrier des lecteurs des deux magazines Amazing Stories et Science Wonder Stories.
Deux courriers de Jerome Siegel: Amazing Stories v04 #05, August 1929, pages 91-92 / Science Wonder Stories v01 06, November 1929, pages 569-570
Deux courriers de Jerome Siegel: Amazing Stories v04 #05, August 1929, pages 91-92 / Science Wonder Stories v01 06, November 1929, pages 569-570
Dans le courrier adressé à Amazing Stories, Siegel mentionne plusieurs nouvelles de science-fiction et utilise le terme scientifiction forgé par Hugo Gernsback, le créateur de ce magazine, considéré comme l’un des pères de la science-fiction. Il déclare aussi être lecteur des pulps All-Story Magazine, Weird Tales, Argosy, et écrire lui-même des nouvelles de science-fiction. Dans le courrier à Science Wonder Stories que Gernsback venait juste de créer après avoir perdu le contrôle d’Amazing Stories, il fait l’éloge de plusieurs auteurs de science-fiction et cite plusieurs de leurs nouvelles. Tout ceci montre une grande familiarité avec les pulp magazines, particulièrement ceux de science-fiction. De plus, dans ce second courrier, Siegel demande à Gernsback si son nouveau magazine compte organiser un concours de couvertures, ce qui indique qu’il était également attentifs aux illustrations des pulps.
La même année, Siegel publie un fascicule intitulé Cosmic Stories qui est considéré comme l’un des premiers fanzine de science-fiction; plusieurs sources affirment que Siegel a publié une annonce pour ce fascicule dans la section des petites annonces de Science Wonder Stories mais nous n’avons pas réussi à retrouver cette publicité.
En 1930, il envoie à Amazing Stories une nouvelle intitulée Miracles on Antares qui est acceptée par le magazine. Elle ne sera finalement pas publiée parce que le magazine avait déjà trop d’histoires en réserve et elle sera retournée à Siegel en 193514. En septembre 1932 enfin, une publicité pour un recueil d’histoires de science-fiction dont une de Siegel paraît dans Amazing Stories15.
Siegel s’associe avec Shuster à cette époque et crée avec lui un second fanzine, Science Fiction: The Advance Guard of Future Civilization. C’est dans le numéro 3 de ce fanzine qu’est publié en janvier 1933 The Reign of the Superman, courte histoire signée Herbert S. Fine dont le héros est une première version de Superman, chauve et méchant mais déjà doté de super-pouvoirs.
The Reign of the Superman, Science Fiction: The Advance Guard of Future Civilization #3, January 1933
The Reign of the Superman, Science Fiction: The Advance Guard of Future Civilization #3, January 1933
En 1930 paraît la nouvelle de Philip Wylie, Gladiator, considérée par beaucoup comme l’une des sources d’inspiration principale de Siegel pour le personnage de Superman. Le héros de Gladiator, Hugo Danner, est en effet doté d’une force surhumaine et sa peau est à l’épreuve des balles. Certaines sources affirment que Siegel avait écrit dans le numéro 2 de son fanzine paru en novembre 1932 un compte-rendu de Gladiator16. Il semble cependant qu’il s’agisse d’une rumeur, au même titre que la légende urbaine selon laquelle Wylie aurait envisagé de poursuivre Siegel et Shuster pour plagiat17. Actuellement, la possible influence de Gladiator sur le personnage de Superman est toujours débattue par les historiens des comics qui estiment toutefois de plus en plus qu’il n’existe pas de source d’inspiration privilégiée pour le personnage de Superman; Siegel aurait plutôt été influencé par de nombreux héros populaires dont les aventures étaient publiées dans les pulps des années 193018.
Un peu plus tard en 1933, Siegel et Shuster préparent une histoire de Superman pour l’éditeur Consolidated Book Publishers. Cette histoire ne sera jamais publiée; elle est perdue mais il subsiste la couverture.
Superman Cover for Consolidated Book Publishers, Joe Shuster and Jerome Siegel, 1933
Superman Cover for Consolidated Book Publishers, Joe Shuster and Jerome Siegel, 1933
Superman n’est plus un « villain » mais il ne possède pas encore ses caractéristiques distinctives, notamment la cape et le collant. Il est possible que cette version perdue empruntait quelques-uns de ses traits au personnage de Doc Savage; on sait par contre que Siegel et Shuster s’en sont inspiré pour la figure du détective Slam Bradley qu’ils créeront ensemble un peu plus tard.
L’histoire des origines de Superman est encore mal connue. Une chose est certaine cependant. Le personnage a ses racines dans les pulps des années trente, particulièrement dans les histoires de science-fiction. Les pulp magazines de science-fiction étaient véritablement la « culture » du jeune Siegel.
Dernier exemple de l’importance des pulps dans cette formation du premier super-héros de comics: l’origine du nom Superman.
On s’obstine encore dans certaines histoires de la bande dessinée à rechercher une filiation, plus ou moins tortueuse, entre ce nom et l’Übermensch de Nietzsche. Grâce aux investigations récentes des fans de pulps et de comics, on s’est aperçu que le mot Superman apparaît dès le début des années 1930 et à plusieurs reprises dans des pulp magazines. Trois images en relation avec des pulps très différents suffiront pour illustrer ce point.
The Superman, physical culture magazine, v2 n1, October 1931 / Superman - the National Physical Culture Magazine, British magazine, August 1933
The Superman, physical culture magazine, v2 n1, October 1931 / Superman – the National Physical Culture Magazine, British magazine, August 1933
Affiche publicitaire Doc Savage, collection Dwight Fuhro. Made by Street & Smith, circa 1933
Affiche publicitaire Doc Savage, collection Dwight Fuhro. Made by Street & Smith, circa 1933
The Superman of Dr. Jukes, by Francis Flagg, Wonder Stories, November 1931
The Superman of Dr. Jukes, by Francis Flagg, Wonder Stories, November 1931
Si l’on peut raisonnablement douter que Siegel et Shuster aient connu le magazine de culture physique britannique, il est possible, connaissant les lectures et les goûts de Siegel, que celui-ci ait lu la nouvelle de Francis Flagg publiée dans Wonder Stories ou vu l’affiche publicitaire pour Doc Savage. Il ne s’agit pas ici d’affirmer que l’origine du nom de Superman soit à rechercher précisément dans tel ou tel pulp, mais simplement de constater que ce nom était « dans l’air » durant la période où le personnage a été créé et que, là encore, il est nécessaire lorsque l’on s’intéresse aux origines des comics de fiction d’étudier méthodiquement les pulp magazines.
Les ressemblances dans les pulp magazines
Cette enquête visuelle se termine par la recherche d’images publiées dans les pulp magazines avant 1938 et qui possèdent un certain degré de ressemblance avec AC1. Le résultat de l’investigation, certainement très incomplète, est organisé selon les quatre motifs relevés au début de l’article: posture, force, automobile détruite, composition.
[Une précision s’impose ici. Quelques-unes des images présentées ci-dessous n’appartiennent pas aux pulps américains des années trente mais à d’autres pulps plus anciens ou publiées ailleurs (pulps anglais, littérature populaire en France). L’extension à d’autres contextes est justifiée car ces illustrations ne sont pas faciles à retrouver (les rares bases de données sur les pulps tout comme celles sur les comics d’ailleurs ne sont pas indexées sur le contenu des images). Nous estimons que l’élargissement du champ de la recherche n’invalide pas l’hypothèse de travail car il s’agit toujours de pulps et qu’il ne fait guère de doute que bien d’autres images semblables existent dans le contexte américain qui nous intéresse plus particulièrement ici. Il suffit de les retrouver…]
La posture
Les images de cette catégorie représentent le plus souvent un homme bras au dessus de la tête brandissant le corps d’un autre homme ou d’une femme, une grosse pierre, etc. Ce ne sont pas encore des super-héros et la charge soulevée ne peut être trop lourde.
Tip Top Library #38, January 2, 1897 / Nick Carter Weekly #272, circa 1905 / The Popular #200 [UK], November 18, 1922 / Weird Tales v13 #5, May 1929 / The Hotspur #9 [UK], October 28, 1933 / Scoops #1 [UK], February 10, 1934, page 11
Tip Top Library #38, January 2, 1897 / Nick Carter Weekly #272, circa 1905 / The Popular #200 [UK], November 18, 1922 / Weird Tales v13 #5, May 1929 / The Hotspur #9 [UK], October 28, 1933 / Scoops #1 [UK], February 10, 1934, page 11
Dans certains cas, la posture figurée n’est pas très éloignée de celle que l’on retrouvera plus tard chez Superman, une jambe mi-fléchie et l’autre jambe en appui.
New Nick Carter Weekly #541, May 11, 1907
New Nick Carter Weekly #541, May 11, 1907
Parfois, il existe un avant-plan avec des personnages effarés représentés tronqués, rappelant un peu la composition d’AC1.
Elle (She), Sir Henry Rider Haggard, Traduction de G. Labouchère, Illustration de Quint, L'Édition Française Illustrée, 1920
Elle (She), Sir Henry Rider Haggard, Traduction de G. Labouchère, Illustration de Quint, L’Édition Française Illustrée, 1920
La force
Les représentations de personnages possédant une force surhumaine sont rares, mais il en existe à la fois dans les pulps et dans les tout premiers comics (apparu en 1929 dans un comic strip, Popeye peut être considéré comme un précurseur des super-héros).
The Wizard #609 [UK], August 4, 1934 / King Comics #3, David McKay, 1936 Series
The Wizard #609 [UK], August 4, 1934 / King Comics #3, David McKay, 1936 Series
En 1919, le magazine Electrical Experimenter fondé par Gernsback explique par une image saisissante les effets de la gravitation sur une petite planète, On remarque que le scaphandre du personnage en couverture a disparu dans les explications plus techniques en pages intérieures.
Electrical Experimenter, v7 #5, Cover art from a painting by George Wall, September 1919, cover and page 398
Electrical Experimenter, v7 #5, Cover art from a painting by George Wall, September 1919, cover and page 398
La même idée est reprise dix ans plus tard dans un autre magazine de Gernsback, cette fois illustrée par Frank R. Paul et sans s’encombrer de scaphandre.
Science Wonder Stories, v1 #2, Cover art by Frank R. Paul, July 1929
Science Wonder Stories, v1 #2, Cover art by Frank R. Paul, July 1929
Dans son éditorial en page intérieure de ce numéro, Gernsback décrit une véritable « expérience en pensée » sur la gravitation.
Si l’on se remémore les courriers de Siegel envoyés cette même année 1929 à Amazing Stories et Science Wonder Stories où il se déclare lecteur assidu et régulier de ces magazines, il est très probable qu’il connaissait cette couverture. Il n’est pas exagéré d’estimer que ce dessin possède une véritable ressemblance de famille avec AC1.
L’automobile détruite
On retrouve dans les pulps des automobiles catapultées en l’air dont les occupants sont projetés hors du véhicule. La scène est observée par des passants effrayés en arrière-plan; l’un d’eux se tient la tête comme sur AC1.
Operator Five v1 #2, May 1934
Operator Five v1 #2, May 1934
Et dans une autre publication de Gersnback toujours illustrée par Paul, une voiture est écrabouillée par un robot. Le conducteur épouvanté quitte la scène en bas à gauche, comme sur AC1.
Wonder Stories, September 1935, Cover and page 416, Art by Frank R. Paul
Wonder Stories, September 1935, Cover and page 416, Art by Frank R. Paul
Mise à jour du 23 mai 2015
Dès 1928, Frank R. Paul a illustré une histoire de robot où l’on retrouve les quatre motifs: posture, force, automobile, composition avec un personnage effrayé au premier plan.
Amazing Stories v03n07, October 1928, Art by Frank R. Paul, page 599
Amazing Stories v03n07, October 1928, Art by Frank R. Paul, page 599
La composition
La figuration de personnages effrayés au premier plan d’une composition est ancienne. C’est un thème récurrent de la peinture classique dans les tableaux représentant la résurrection du Christ.
La résurrection du Christ, successivement par: Tiziano Vecellio (Titien), 1542-1544 / Véronèse, 1560 / Peter Paul Rubens, 1611 / Antoine Caron, vers 1589 / Noël Coypel, 1700
La résurrection du Christ, successivement par: Tiziano Vecellio (Titien), 1542-1544 / Véronèse, 1560 / Peter Paul Rubens, 1611 / Antoine Caron, vers 1589 / Noël Coypel, 1700
On doit se garder cependant d’imaginer une hypothétique influence de cette construction sur les créateurs de Superman. Il n’est pas question ici de tirer une conclusion « à la Knowles » à propos de ce rapprochement, de rechercher l’onction de l’Art sur une production culturelle esthétiquement insignifiante, ou mieux encore d’insister sur le caractère christique de Superman !19. S’il existe une réelle continuité entre les pulps et les comics de fiction de l’âge d’or, il n’en existe aucune entre l’art de la Renaissance et les comics.
Rappelons que le fugitif en bas à gauche sur AC1 est représenté partiellement, une partie de son corps est en dehors du cadre. Il existe certes des représentations de personnages tronqués dans la peinture classique20, mais elles semblent assez rares. Par contre, dans les pulp magazines des années 1920-1930, les figurations de personnages au premier plan qui cumulent les deux caractéristiques, c’est-à-dire à la fois effrayés et tronqués, sont extrêmement nombreuses.
Weird Tales, December 1926 / Amazing Stories v3 #11, February 1929 / The Spider v2 #1, February 1934 / The Hotspur #48 [UK], July 28, 1934 / The Secret Six v1#1, October 1934 / The Secret Six v1#2, November 1934 / The Spider v4 #2, November 1934 / The Secret Six v1#3, December 1934 / Buzzer #18, February 12 1938
Weird Tales, December 1926 / Amazing Stories v3 #11, February 1929 / The Spider v2 #1, February 1934 / The Hotspur #48 [UK], July 28, 1934 / The Secret Six v1#1, October 1934 / The Secret Six v1#2, November 1934 / The Spider v4 #2, November 1934 / The Secret Six v1#3, December 1934 / Buzzer #18, February 12 1938
L’année 1934 est particulièrement bien représentée avec des titres comme The Secret Six et The Spider. Mais le record est détenu par la série publiée par Operator Five en 1934-1935.
Operator Five v1#1, April 1934 / Operator Five v2#4, November 1934 / Operator Five v3#1, December 1934 / Operator Five v3#4, March 1935 / Operator Five v5#1, August 1935 / Operator Five v6#1, December 1935
Operator Five v1#1, April 1934 / Operator Five v2#4, November 1934 / Operator Five v3#1, December 1934 / Operator Five v3#4, March 1935 / Operator Five v5#1, August 1935 / Operator Five v6#1, December 1935
Il n’est pas nécessaire de multiplier les exemples pour être convaincu qu’il s’agit là d’un véritable trope visuel dans les pulps des années 1930. On peut se demander au passage si, avec l’importance prise alors par la photographie instantanée, les clichés qui présentent un cadrage partiel d’un sujet en mouvement ont pu susciter cette « mode » des personnages tronqués et affolés représentés sur les pulps.
Des ressemblances de voisinage ?
Pour chacun des quatre motifs graphiques repérés sur AC1, il est possible de retrouver de nombreuses couvertures de pulps qui présentent certaines similitudes. Autrement dit, pour reprendre la terminologie des ressemblances introduite plus haut, il existe une série de ressemblances sans prototype dans un contexte éditorial proche et une période qui précède immédiatement la parution d’AC1: les pulp magazines des années 1920-1930.
Si l’influence des pulps sur l’émergence des comics est bien connue en ce qui concerne les thèmes des histoires ou les caractéristiques générales des héros par exemple, on sous-estime d’une manière générale l’importance des illustrations qu’ils comportent, surtout pour les pulps de science-fiction. Réalisées par des artistes imaginatifs, les couvertures et les illustrations intérieures de ces magazines originaux étaient bien connues des premiers dessinateurs de comics de fiction, et ceux-ci ont sans aucun doute été influencés par ces dessins. AC1 appartient bien à cette période où les comics encore très jeunes puisent largement leurs thèmes et leurs références, y compris visuelles, dans les pulp magazines. Avec un peu d’audace, le dessin d’AC1 apparaît comme une synthèse de motifs graphiques facilement reconnaissables dans les pulp magazines qui ont immédiatement précédé l’âge d’or des comic books. Si les ressemblances en question ne sont évidement pas des ressemblances de famille, elles se conjuguent, elles forment un ensemble cohérent qui relie AC1 aux pulps des années 1920-1930, et ce lien semble presque leur conférer un caractère de ressemblances de famille; on peut les qualifier de ressemblances de voisinage.





Références
  • Mike Ashley and Robert A. W. Lowndes, The Gernsback Days – A Study of the Evolution of Modern Science Fiction From 1911 to 1936, Wildside Press, 2004
  • Daniel Best, A Rose By Any Other Name, 20th Century Danny Boy, June 26, 2006
  • Daniel Best, DC vs Siegel: DC’s Appeal Brief & Who DID Draw The Action Comics #1 Cover? 20th Century Danny Boy, March 29, 2012
  • Umberto Eco, De superman au surhomme, traduction française par Myriem Bouzaher, Le Livre de Poche, 1995
  • Gregory Feeley, When World-views Collide: Philip Wylie in the Twenty-first Century, Science Fiction Studies #95, Volume 32, Part 1, March 2005
  • Robert Greenberger (Editor), Superman in the Forties, DC Comics, 2005
  • R.C. Harvey, Who Discovered Superman, The Comics Journal, January 6, 2014
  • Wendy Haslem, Angela Ndalianis, Chris Mackie (editors), Super/Heroes: From Hercules to Superman, New Academia Publishing, LLC, 2007
  • Jean-Paul Jennequin, Histoire du Comic Book. Tome 1, Des origines à 1954, Vertige Graphic, 2002
  • Daniel A. Kaufman, Family Resemblances, Relationalism and the Meaning of Art, British Journal of Aesthetics, vol. 47, No. 3, July 2007 [PDF]
  • Dennis Knepp, Superman Family Resemblance, Chapter 19 in Superman and Philosophy: What Would the Man of Steel Do? edited by Mark D. White, John Wiley & Sons, 2013
  • Christopher Knowles and Joseph Michael Linsner (illustrations), Our Gods Wear Spandex: The Secret History of Comic Book Heroes, Red Wheel/Weiser, 2007
  • Christopher Lowring Knowles, Is Action Comics #1 a Swipe?, November 20, 2007
  • Chris Knowles, The « Action Comics » #1 Cover Debate, Comic Book Resources, Part 1, November 28, 2007 – Part 2, November 29, 2007
  • Anton Karl Kozlovic, Superman as Christ-Figure: The American Pop Culture Movie Messiah, Journal of Religion and Film, Vol. 6 No. 1 April 2002
  • Jean-Noël Lafargue, Entre la plèbe et l’élite – les ambitions contraires de la bande dessinée, Atelier Perrousseaux , 2012
  • Danielle Lories, Philosophie analytique et définition de l’art, Revue Philosophique de Louvain, 1985, Volume 83, Numéro 58, pp. 214-230
  • Alex Nikolavitch, Mythe & super-héros, Les Moutons électriques, 2011
  • Pádraig Ó Méalóid, Gladiator Vs Superman, November 25, 2009
  • « Pappy », Another superman before Superman, Papy’s Golden Age Comics Blogzine, February 6, 2015
  • Britton Payne, Comparison of Covers from Superman vs. Captain Marvel, [s.d.]
  • David Reynolds, Superheroes: An Analysis of Popular Culture’s Modern Myths, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2012
  • Richard Reynolds, Super Heroes: A Modern Mythology (Studies in Popular Culture), Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1994
  • Brian J. Robb, A Brief History of Superheroes, Robinson Publishing, 2014
  • Morris Weitz, The Role of Theory in Aesthetics, The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, Vol. 15, No. 1, pp. 27-35, September 1956 [PDF]
  • Ludwig Wittgenstein, Investigations philosophiques, 1953, traduction française par Pierre Klossowski. Gallimard, 1961.
  1. L’histoire est reproduite intégralement sur The Classic Comics Reading Room.
  2. Lire DC vs Siegel: DC’s Appeal Brief & Who DID Draw The Action Comics #1 Cover? by Daniel Best.
  3. Les exégètes estiment que le modèle de la voiture qui figure en couverture est une DeSoto 1937 tandis que celle dessinée par Shuster dans l’histoire serait une Plymouth Deluxe 1937, cf. Now You Know: The Car On The Cover Of Action Comics #1 Is A 1937 DeSoto (But That’s Just Part Of The Story), by Mark Seifert, May 24, 2013.
  4. Morris Weitz, The Role of Theory in Aesthetics, The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, Vol. 15, No. 1, pp. 27-35, September 1956 [PDF].
  5. Dennis Knepp, Superman Family Resemblance, Chapter 19 in Superman and Philosophy: What Would the Man of Steel Do? edited by Mark D. White, John Wiley & Sons, 2013. Même s’il est évidemment plus fréquent de mobiliser Nietzsche à propos de super-héros, Knepp n’est pas le seul à faire appel à la philosophie de Wittgenstein dans l’étude des comics. David Reynolds par exemple recourt aux jeux de langages de Wittgenstein et aux paradigmes de Kuhn pour développer sa thèse selon laquelle les super-héros ne sont rien d’autre que des mythes modernes dans la culture populaire américaine – voir David Reynolds, Superheroes: An Analysis of Popular Culture’s Modern Myths, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, 2012, pages 49 sq.
  6. Wendy Siuyi Wong, Hong Kong Comics, une histoire du manhua, Urban China, 2015, page 109.
  7. En ce sens une imagerie devient bien «  un corpus thématique cohérent, doté d’une capacité générative ou virale, autrement dit d’une productivité qui atteste et entretient son succès » André Gunthert, Désigner la dissimulation, figure de l’islamophobie, 4 février 2015, note 3.
  8. L’un des premiers ouvrages d’envergure sur le sujet est celui de Richard Reynolds: Super Heroes: A Modern Mythology (Studies in Popular Culture), Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1994.
  9. Brian J. Robb, A Brief History of Superheroes, Robinson Publishing, 2014, p. 12.
  10. Umberto Eco, De superman au surhomme, traduction française par Myriem Bouzaher, Le Livre de Poche, 1995, p. 115.
  11. Wendy Haslem, Angela Ndalianis, Chris Mackie (editors), Super/Heroes: From Hercules to Superman, New Academia Publishing, LLC, 2007.
  12. Christopher Knowles and Joseph Michael Linsner (illustrations), Our Gods Wear Spandex: The Secret History of Comic Book Heroes, Red Wheel/Weiser, 2007.
  13. Voir par exemple Jean-Noël Lafargue, Entre la plèbe et l’élite – les ambitions contraires de la bande dessinée, Atelier Perrousseaux , 2012, p. 33; Jean-Paul Jennequin, Histoire du Comic Book. Tome 1, Des origines à 1954, Vertige Graphic, 2002, p. 12; Brian J. Robb, A Brief History of Superheroes, Robinson Publishing, 2014, p. 22., etc., les références abondent. Même Knowles que nous venons d’éreinter consacre un chapitre entier aux pulps (op. cit. p. 73 sq.).
  14. Mike Ashley and Robert A. W. Lowndes, The Gernsback Days – A Study of the Evolution of Modern Science Fiction From 1911 to 1936, Wildside Press, 2004, p. 217.
  15. The Gersnback Days, pp. 346-347.
  16. Voir par exemple Robb, op. cit. p. 31.
  17. cf. Pádraig Ó Méalóid, Gladiator Vs Superman, November 25, 2009.
  18. Cf. Gregory Feeley, When World-views Collide: Philip Wylie in the Twenty-first Century, Science Fiction Studies #95, Volume 32, Part 1, March 2005.
  19. Qui existe bien entendu, voir: Anton Karl Kozlovic, Superman as Christ-Figure: The American Pop Culture Movie Messiah, Journal of Religion and Film, Vol. 6 No. 1 April 2002.
  20. Par exemple: Le Christ en croix adoré par deux donateurs (El Greco) ou Esquisse pour la Vierge du Sacré-Coeur (Delacroix). Merci à Alain François pour son aide concernant ce point.
  1. Article incroyable, comme d’habitude ! Une merveille !
    Je vois deux choses :
    – L’imitation apparait massivement au moment où la BD, de manière globale, devient un objet culturel acceptable socialement. Donc, la conversion en icône de cette couverture coïncide avec la prise de conscience du monde de la BD et du comics de faire « œuvre culturelle ».
    L’autre chose, c’est un minuscule bémol :
    « S’il existe une réelle continuité entre les pulps et les comics de fiction de l’âge d’or, il n’en existe aucune entre l’art de la Renaissance et les comics. »
    Si : l’apprentissage du dessin, apprentissage lourd et culturel. Mais les dessinateurs de comics n’avaient pas toujours une formation classique. Si Alex Raymond est célèbre pour sa formation solide, par exemple, c’est bien que les autres étaient parfois autodidactes.
    Pour l’anecdote, quand on discutait sur facebook, l’autre jour, mon voisin d’atelier Elric Dufau se penche et regarde la couverture et dit « c’est surtout un très mauvais dessin ! »
    En fait, l’absence de continuité culturelle entre une couverture de comics et n’importe quelle image d’ailleurs et l’histoire de l’Art est une exception. La très grande majorité des dessinateurs sont des professionnels très formés et visuellement très cultivés. C’est un étrange hasard historique, économique (et la conséquence de la connotation très négative du métier pendant longtemps) qui fait qu’à certains moments de l’histoire de la BD, des autodidactes (parfois très mauvais) ont fait des carrières graphiques…
  2. Je précise : « une couverture de comics et n’importe quelle image » produite par un professionnel. Aujourd’hui, la majorité des images qui circulent ne l’est pas.
    • Patrick Peccatte
      Je n’avais pas pensé à la concomitance de l’émergence de l’imitation et de la transformation de la BD en objet culturel respectable. C’est juste, merci Alain.
      Sur la « continuité », j’ai été trop elliptique et le terme de « continuité » n’est sans doute pas approprié ou nécessiterait quelques précisions. Peut-être aussi que nous ne le comprenons pas de la même façon. Je sais bien que certains dessinateurs comme Alex Raymond avaient suivi une formation classique. Le moins que l’on puisse dire – et l’avis d’Elric le confirme – c’est que Shuster à l’époque de la création de Superman était un dessinateur autodidacte médiocre et sans grande culture classique. Je ne sais pas si c’est une « conséquence de la connotation très négative du métier pendant longtemps »; Hal Foster, le créateur de Prince Vaillant, autre artiste américano-canadien de la même période et au parcours comparable, lui aussi émigré aux États-Unis, avait par contre une solide formation.
      En fait, je voulais dire qu’il existe une proximité culturelle et temporelle forte entre les pulp magazines et les comics, surtout pour le genre « science-fiction » d’où provient Superman; et comme les premiers sont apparus avant les seconds, j’ai parlé de « continuité ». Peut-être aurais-je dû dire « contiguïté » ou « voisinage » culturel, comme à la fin de mon article.
  3. En fait, dans la filiation visuelle de ce dessin, il y a un champ que vous laissez de côté, qui est l’affiche foraine de la fin du XIX° et du début du XX°. Le Superman de 1938 faisait au moins en partie référence aux Hercule de foire (d’où les lacets montants dans les premiers épisodes de Superman dans Action Comics). Il était assez courant que ces « hercules » figurent sur des affiches dans une position où ils soulevaient ce qui était jugé « non-soulevable » à mains nues. Vous pouvez par exemple retrouver cette idée dans des affiches de « Jack de Fer » http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b9003148d/f1.highres et de « Jean le Cric », qui portaient (au moins sur les affiches) des chevaux, des pianos ou même des éléphants.
    Et si on remonte encore un peu plus loin, on retrouve cet archétype dans un média non-visuel (mais adapté à l’image de nombreuses fois depuis) : dans les Misérables, Jean Valjean est surnommé « Jean le Cric » (ce qui inspirera plus tard le nom de l’hercule de foire déjà cité) parce qu’il a une force prodigieuse. Le policier chargé de le retrouver le démasque des années plus tard parce que Valjean est seul au monde capable de soulever… une charette. Tout celà échappant, bien sûr, aux créateurs de Superman. Mais plus sûrement ils lorgnaient sur les affiches de cirques et ont donc indirectement placé leur personnage dans cette filiation.
    • Patrick Peccatte
      Merci pour ces précisions.
      J’ai mentionné dans mon article un tel Hercule de foire figuré sur la couverture du pulp anglais The Wizzard en 1934 (voir ici). Il serait en effet très intéressant de rechercher les affiches américaines, de cirque ou de spectacles divers, qui auraient pu inspirer Siegel et Shuster. Il n’est pas certain toutefois que la référence soit aussi manifeste que dans le cas des pulp magazines de fiction que ces auteurs connaissaient fort bien. Cette influence plausible mériterait en tout cas une véritable illustration démonstrative dans le contexte américain de l’époque.
      La possible influence du personnage de Jean Valjean a été évoquée par Jean-Noël Lafargue dans une discussion sur Facebook au moment de la publication de mon article. A l’époque, nous avions recherché des images des Misérables figurant la scène de la charrette, parues dans des pulps américains vers les années 1930, et que les auteurs de Superman auraient pu connaître. Sans succès à ce jour, mais il en existe peut-être (et d’autre part, Siegel ou Shuster connaissaient peut-être le roman de Victor Hugo…). Même si les pulps sont sans aucun doute à l’origine des super-héros, je retiens de votre commentaire que certains de leurs traits distinctifs peuvent en effet avoir leurs racines dans d’autres champs de la culture ordinaire.